The War Of Mini Computers: Will Micro:Bit Kill Raspberry Pi?

The BBC Micro:Bit, a matchbox-sized computer will be given to year seven students in the UK. For those wandering what the reach of this single board computer will be, and how Raspberry Pi (the other pint-sized computer) could be impacted, read on to know more. Find out whether mini computers are the answer or cause of health problems in the classroom too. The Features The Micro:Bit computer has 256 KB of flash and 16 KB of RAM. It was manufactured by element14. As far as the RAM is concerned, there is no way to compare it with the Acorn designed, three-decade old BBC Micro Model A. But if size is any predictor of success, the Micro:Bit could be just the thing educational technology needs.Like us on Facebook Artificial Intelligence: Scientists Developed a Handwriting Algorithm The Benefits Heavy lifting will become a thing of the past with this new micro-computer, reports the Register. As it is so small, and runs multiple apps and browsers as well as single programs, students will have a rich interface to use. This will also contribute towards differentiated learning, cognitive development and creativity in classrooms, according to Boundless.com. For a rich learning experience, students will not be left far behind because the interactive interface comes with lesson plans, array of code samples and videos. Know more and know it easily seems to be the USP of the Micro:Bit. For the smartphone generation, instant gratification of the Micro:Bit will even leave the Raspberry Pi behind, some reports say. Educational technology that reaches kids and does not have to be force fed to them would be a boon for the education sector. Apart from instant message processing, you get “event driven programming, loops, simple variables” as well as the “ability to make it complain if you pick it up.” For upping motivation levels in the study room, there is nothing quite like a new and exciting gadget. But the Register holds that Raspberry Pi would not get creamed as of yet, because it uses Linux which Micro:Bit does not. So what other features does this wonder gadget have? The runtime has a Device Abstraction Layer, meaning languages can be plugged into a jump table. Beginning programmers who don’t know the ABC of coding can use this device easily. It has two Cortex Micro Processing Units/MPUs to prevent problems during booting, communication and loading. The computer’s nordic semiconductor ARM context provides the capacity to use Bluetooth technology and execution of applications that are self contained. The power comes from AAA batteries which are almost everlasting and the LED grid also has surface mounting. All in all, just the right gadget to get a little creativity and a lot of technology right into the classroom. Photo Sources: Victor Keegan/Flickr, Marcie Casas/Flickr

The War Of Mini Computers: Will Micro:Bit Kill Raspberry Pi?

The BBC Micro:Bit, a matchbox-sized computer will be given to year seven students in the UK. For those wandering what the reach of this single board computer will be, and how Raspberry Pi (the other pint-sized computer) could be impacted, read on to know more. Find out whether mini computers are the answer or cause of health problems in the classroom too. The Features The Micro:Bit computer has 256 KB of flash and 16 KB of RAM. It was manufactured by element14. As far as the RAM is concerned, there is no way to compare it with the Acorn designed, three-decade old BBC Micro Model A. But if size is any predictor of success, the Micro:Bit could be just the thing educational technology needs.Like us on Facebook Artificial Intelligence: Scientists Developed a Handwriting Algorithm The Benefits Heavy lifting will become a thing of the past with this new micro-computer, reports the Register. As it is so small, and runs multiple apps and browsers as well as single programs, students will have a rich interface to use. This will also contribute towards differentiated learning, cognitive development and creativity in classrooms, according to Boundless.com. For a rich learning experience, students will not be left far behind because the interactive interface comes with lesson plans, array of code samples and videos. Know more and know it easily seems to be the USP of the Micro:Bit. For the smartphone generation, instant gratification of the Micro:Bit will even leave the Raspberry Pi behind, some reports say. Educational technology that reaches kids and does not have to be force fed to them would be a boon for the education sector. Apart from instant message processing, you get “event driven programming, loops, simple variables” as well as the “ability to make it complain if you pick it up.” For upping motivation levels in the study room, there is nothing quite like a new and exciting gadget. But the Register holds that Raspberry Pi would not get creamed as of yet, because it uses Linux which Micro:Bit does not. So what other features does this wonder gadget have? The runtime has a Device Abstraction Layer, meaning languages can be plugged into a jump table. Beginning programmers who don’t know the ABC of coding can use this device easily. It has two Cortex Micro Processing Units/MPUs to prevent problems during booting, communication and loading. The computer’s nordic semiconductor ARM context provides the capacity to use Bluetooth technology and execution of applications that are self contained. The power comes from AAA batteries which are almost everlasting and the LED grid also has surface mounting. All in all, just the right gadget to get a little creativity and a lot of technology right into the classroom. Photo Sources: Victor Keegan/Flickr, Marcie Casas/Flickr

The War Of Mini Computers: Will Micro:Bit Kill Raspberry Pi?

The BBC Micro:Bit, a matchbox-sized computer will be given to year seven students in the UK. For those wandering what the reach of this single board computer will be, and how Raspberry Pi (the other pint-sized computer) could be impacted, read on to know more. Find out whether mini computers are the answer or cause of health problems in the classroom too. The Features The Micro:Bit computer has 256 KB of flash and 16 KB of RAM. It was manufactured by element14. As far as the RAM is concerned, there is no way to compare it with the Acorn designed, three-decade old BBC Micro Model A. But if size is any predictor of success, the Micro:Bit could be just the thing educational technology needs.Like us on Facebook Artificial Intelligence: Scientists Developed a Handwriting Algorithm The Benefits Heavy lifting will become a thing of the past with this new micro-computer, reports the Register. As it is so small, and runs multiple apps and browsers as well as single programs, students will have a rich interface to use. This will also contribute towards differentiated learning, cognitive development and creativity in classrooms, according to Boundless.com. For a rich learning experience, students will not be left far behind because the interactive interface comes with lesson plans, array of code samples and videos. Know more and know it easily seems to be the USP of the Micro:Bit. For the smartphone generation, instant gratification of the Micro:Bit will even leave the Raspberry Pi behind, some reports say. Educational technology that reaches kids and does not have to be force fed to them would be a boon for the education sector. Apart from instant message processing, you get “event driven programming, loops, simple variables” as well as the “ability to make it complain if you pick it up.” For upping motivation levels in the study room, there is nothing quite like a new and exciting gadget. But the Register holds that Raspberry Pi would not get creamed as of yet, because it uses Linux which Micro:Bit does not. So what other features does this wonder gadget have? The runtime has a Device Abstraction Layer, meaning languages can be plugged into a jump table. Beginning programmers who don’t know the ABC of coding can use this device easily. It has two Cortex Micro Processing Units/MPUs to prevent problems during booting, communication and loading. The computer’s nordic semiconductor ARM context provides the capacity to use Bluetooth technology and execution of applications that are self contained. The power comes from AAA batteries which are almost everlasting and the LED grid also has surface mounting. All in all, just the right gadget to get a little creativity and a lot of technology right into the classroom. Photo Sources: Victor Keegan/Flickr, Marcie Casas/Flickr

The War Of Mini Computers: Will Micro:Bit Kill Raspberry Pi?

The BBC Micro:Bit, a matchbox-sized computer will be given to year seven students in the UK. For those wandering what the reach of this single board computer will be, and how Raspberry Pi (the other pint-sized computer) could be impacted, read on to know more. Find out whether mini computers are the answer or cause of health problems in the classroom too. The Features The Micro:Bit computer has 256 KB of flash and 16 KB of RAM. It was manufactured by element14. As far as the RAM is concerned, there is no way to compare it with the Acorn designed, three-decade old BBC Micro Model A. But if size is any predictor of success, the Micro:Bit could be just the thing educational technology needs.Like us on Facebook Artificial Intelligence: Scientists Developed a Handwriting Algorithm The Benefits Heavy lifting will become a thing of the past with this new micro-computer, reports the Register. As it is so small, and runs multiple apps and browsers as well as single programs, students will have a rich interface to use. This will also contribute towards differentiated learning, cognitive development and creativity in classrooms, according to Boundless.com. For a rich learning experience, students will not be left far behind because the interactive interface comes with lesson plans, array of code samples and videos. Know more and know it easily seems to be the USP of the Micro:Bit. For the smartphone generation, instant gratification of the Micro:Bit will even leave the Raspberry Pi behind, some reports say. Educational technology that reaches kids and does not have to be force fed to them would be a boon for the education sector. Apart from instant message processing, you get “event driven programming, loops, simple variables” as well as the “ability to make it complain if you pick it up.” For upping motivation levels in the study room, there is nothing quite like a new and exciting gadget. But the Register holds that Raspberry Pi would not get creamed as of yet, because it uses Linux which Micro:Bit does not. So what other features does this wonder gadget have? The runtime has a Device Abstraction Layer, meaning languages can be plugged into a jump table. Beginning programmers who don’t know the ABC of coding can use this device easily. It has two Cortex Micro Processing Units/MPUs to prevent problems during booting, communication and loading. The computer’s nordic semiconductor ARM context provides the capacity to use Bluetooth technology and execution of applications that are self contained. The power comes from AAA batteries which are almost everlasting and the LED grid also has surface mounting. All in all, just the right gadget to get a little creativity and a lot of technology right into the classroom. Photo Sources: Victor Keegan/Flickr, Marcie Casas/Flickr

The War Of Mini Computers: Will Micro:Bit Kill Raspberry Pi?

The BBC Micro:Bit, a matchbox-sized computer will be given to year seven students in the UK. For those wandering what the reach of this single board computer will be, and how Raspberry Pi (the other pint-sized computer) could be impacted, read on to know more. Find out whether mini computers are the answer or cause of health problems in the classroom too. The Features The Micro:Bit computer has 256 KB of flash and 16 KB of RAM. It was manufactured by element14. As far as the RAM is concerned, there is no way to compare it with the Acorn designed, three-decade old BBC Micro Model A. But if size is any predictor of success, the Micro:Bit could be just the thing educational technology needs.Like us on Facebook Artificial Intelligence: Scientists Developed a Handwriting Algorithm The Benefits Heavy lifting will become a thing of the past with this new micro-computer, reports the Register. As it is so small, and runs multiple apps and browsers as well as single programs, students will have a rich interface to use. This will also contribute towards differentiated learning, cognitive development and creativity in classrooms, according to Boundless.com. For a rich learning experience, students will not be left far behind because the interactive interface comes with lesson plans, array of code samples and videos. Know more and know it easily seems to be the USP of the Micro:Bit. For the smartphone generation, instant gratification of the Micro:Bit will even leave the Raspberry Pi behind, some reports say. Educational technology that reaches kids and does not have to be force fed to them would be a boon for the education sector. Apart from instant message processing, you get “event driven programming, loops, simple variables” as well as the “ability to make it complain if you pick it up.” For upping motivation levels in the study room, there is nothing quite like a new and exciting gadget. But the Register holds that Raspberry Pi would not get creamed as of yet, because it uses Linux which Micro:Bit does not. So what other features does this wonder gadget have? The runtime has a Device Abstraction Layer, meaning languages can be plugged into a jump table. Beginning programmers who don’t know the ABC of coding can use this device easily. It has two Cortex Micro Processing Units/MPUs to prevent problems during booting, communication and loading. The computer’s nordic semiconductor ARM context provides the capacity to use Bluetooth technology and execution of applications that are self contained. The power comes from AAA batteries which are almost everlasting and the LED grid also has surface mounting. All in all, just the right gadget to get a little creativity and a lot of technology right into the classroom. Photo Sources: Victor Keegan/Flickr, Marcie Casas/Flickr

The War Of Mini Computers: Will Micro:Bit Kill Raspberry Pi?

The BBC Micro:Bit, a matchbox-sized computer will be given to year seven students in the UK. For those wandering what the reach of this single board computer will be, and how Raspberry Pi (the other pint-sized computer) could be impacted, read on to know more. Find out whether mini computers are the answer or cause of health problems in the classroom too. The Features The Micro:Bit computer has 256 KB of flash and 16 KB of RAM. It was manufactured by element14. As far as the RAM is concerned, there is no way to compare it with the Acorn designed, three-decade old BBC Micro Model A. But if size is any predictor of success, the Micro:Bit could be just the thing educational technology needs.Like us on Facebook Artificial Intelligence: Scientists Developed a Handwriting Algorithm The Benefits Heavy lifting will become a thing of the past with this new micro-computer, reports the Register. As it is so small, and runs multiple apps and browsers as well as single programs, students will have a rich interface to use. This will also contribute towards differentiated learning, cognitive development and creativity in classrooms, according to Boundless.com. For a rich learning experience, students will not be left far behind because the interactive interface comes with lesson plans, array of code samples and videos. Know more and know it easily seems to be the USP of the Micro:Bit. For the smartphone generation, instant gratification of the Micro:Bit will even leave the Raspberry Pi behind, some reports say. Educational technology that reaches kids and does not have to be force fed to them would be a boon for the education sector. Apart from instant message processing, you get “event driven programming, loops, simple variables” as well as the “ability to make it complain if you pick it up.” For upping motivation levels in the study room, there is nothing quite like a new and exciting gadget. But the Register holds that Raspberry Pi would not get creamed as of yet, because it uses Linux which Micro:Bit does not. So what other features does this wonder gadget have? The runtime has a Device Abstraction Layer, meaning languages can be plugged into a jump table. Beginning programmers who don’t know the ABC of coding can use this device easily. It has two Cortex Micro Processing Units/MPUs to prevent problems during booting, communication and loading. The computer’s nordic semiconductor ARM context provides the capacity to use Bluetooth technology and execution of applications that are self contained. The power comes from AAA batteries which are almost everlasting and the LED grid also has surface mounting. All in all, just the right gadget to get a little creativity and a lot of technology right into the classroom. Photo Sources: Victor Keegan/Flickr, Marcie Casas/Flickr

The War Of Mini Computers: Will Micro:Bit Kill Raspberry Pi?

The BBC Micro:Bit, a matchbox-sized computer will be given to year seven students in the UK. For those wandering what the reach of this single board computer will be, and how Raspberry Pi (the other pint-sized computer) could be impacted, read on to know more. Find out whether mini computers are the answer or cause of health problems in the classroom too. The Features The Micro:Bit computer has 256 KB of flash and 16 KB of RAM. It was manufactured by element14. As far as the RAM is concerned, there is no way to compare it with the Acorn designed, three-decade old BBC Micro Model A. But if size is any predictor of success, the Micro:Bit could be just the thing educational technology needs.Like us on Facebook Artificial Intelligence: Scientists Developed a Handwriting Algorithm The Benefits Heavy lifting will become a thing of the past with this new micro-computer, reports the Register. As it is so small, and runs multiple apps and browsers as well as single programs, students will have a rich interface to use. This will also contribute towards differentiated learning, cognitive development and creativity in classrooms, according to Boundless.com. For a rich learning experience, students will not be left far behind because the interactive interface comes with lesson plans, array of code samples and videos. Know more and know it easily seems to be the USP of the Micro:Bit. For the smartphone generation, instant gratification of the Micro:Bit will even leave the Raspberry Pi behind, some reports say. Educational technology that reaches kids and does not have to be force fed to them would be a boon for the education sector. Apart from instant message processing, you get “event driven programming, loops, simple variables” as well as the “ability to make it complain if you pick it up.” For upping motivation levels in the study room, there is nothing quite like a new and exciting gadget. But the Register holds that Raspberry Pi would not get creamed as of yet, because it uses Linux which Micro:Bit does not. So what other features does this wonder gadget have? The runtime has a Device Abstraction Layer, meaning languages can be plugged into a jump table. Beginning programmers who don’t know the ABC of coding can use this device easily. It has two Cortex Micro Processing Units/MPUs to prevent problems during booting, communication and loading. The computer’s nordic semiconductor ARM context provides the capacity to use Bluetooth technology and execution of applications that are self contained. The power comes from AAA batteries which are almost everlasting and the LED grid also has surface mounting. All in all, just the right gadget to get a little creativity and a lot of technology right into the classroom. Photo Sources: Victor Keegan/Flickr, Marcie Casas/Flickr

The War Of Mini Computers: Will Micro:Bit Kill Raspberry Pi?

The BBC Micro:Bit, a matchbox-sized computer will be given to year seven students in the UK. For those wandering what the reach of this single board computer will be, and how Raspberry Pi (the other pint-sized computer) could be impacted, read on to know more. Find out whether mini computers are the answer or cause of health problems in the classroom too. The Features The Micro:Bit computer has 256 KB of flash and 16 KB of RAM. It was manufactured by element14. As far as the RAM is concerned, there is no way to compare it with the Acorn designed, three-decade old BBC Micro Model A. But if size is any predictor of success, the Micro:Bit could be just the thing educational technology needs.Like us on Facebook Artificial Intelligence: Scientists Developed a Handwriting Algorithm The Benefits Heavy lifting will become a thing of the past with this new micro-computer, reports the Register. As it is so small, and runs multiple apps and browsers as well as single programs, students will have a rich interface to use. This will also contribute towards differentiated learning, cognitive development and creativity in classrooms, according to Boundless.com. For a rich learning experience, students will not be left far behind because the interactive interface comes with lesson plans, array of code samples and videos. Know more and know it easily seems to be the USP of the Micro:Bit. For the smartphone generation, instant gratification of the Micro:Bit will even leave the Raspberry Pi behind, some reports say. Educational technology that reaches kids and does not have to be force fed to them would be a boon for the education sector. Apart from instant message processing, you get “event driven programming, loops, simple variables” as well as the “ability to make it complain if you pick it up.” For upping motivation levels in the study room, there is nothing quite like a new and exciting gadget. But the Register holds that Raspberry Pi would not get creamed as of yet, because it uses Linux which Micro:Bit does not. So what other features does this wonder gadget have? The runtime has a Device Abstraction Layer, meaning languages can be plugged into a jump table. Beginning programmers who don’t know the ABC of coding can use this device easily. It has two Cortex Micro Processing Units/MPUs to prevent problems during booting, communication and loading. The computer’s nordic semiconductor ARM context provides the capacity to use Bluetooth technology and execution of applications that are self contained. The power comes from AAA batteries which are almost everlasting and the LED grid also has surface mounting. All in all, just the right gadget to get a little creativity and a lot of technology right into the classroom. Photo Sources: Victor Keegan/Flickr, Marcie Casas/Flickr

The War Of Mini Computers: Will Micro:Bit Kill Raspberry Pi?

The BBC Micro:Bit, a matchbox-sized computer will be given to year seven students in the UK. For those wandering what the reach of this single board computer will be, and how Raspberry Pi (the other pint-sized computer) could be impacted, read on to know more. Find out whether mini computers are the answer or cause of health problems in the classroom too. The Features The Micro:Bit computer has 256 KB of flash and 16 KB of RAM. It was manufactured by element14. As far as the RAM is concerned, there is no way to compare it with the Acorn designed, three-decade old BBC Micro Model A. But if size is any predictor of success, the Micro:Bit could be just the thing educational technology needs.Like us on Facebook Artificial Intelligence: Scientists Developed a Handwriting Algorithm The Benefits Heavy lifting will become a thing of the past with this new micro-computer, reports the Register. As it is so small, and runs multiple apps and browsers as well as single programs, students will have a rich interface to use. This will also contribute towards differentiated learning, cognitive development and creativity in classrooms, according to Boundless.com. For a rich learning experience, students will not be left far behind because the interactive interface comes with lesson plans, array of code samples and videos. Know more and know it easily seems to be the USP of the Micro:Bit. For the smartphone generation, instant gratification of the Micro:Bit will even leave the Raspberry Pi behind, some reports say. Educational technology that reaches kids and does not have to be force fed to them would be a boon for the education sector. Apart from instant message processing, you get “event driven programming, loops, simple variables” as well as the “ability to make it complain if you pick it up.” For upping motivation levels in the study room, there is nothing quite like a new and exciting gadget. But the Register holds that Raspberry Pi would not get creamed as of yet, because it uses Linux which Micro:Bit does not. So what other features does this wonder gadget have? The runtime has a Device Abstraction Layer, meaning languages can be plugged into a jump table. Beginning programmers who don’t know the ABC of coding can use this device easily. It has two Cortex Micro Processing Units/MPUs to prevent problems during booting, communication and loading. The computer’s nordic semiconductor ARM context provides the capacity to use Bluetooth technology and execution of applications that are self contained. The power comes from AAA batteries which are almost everlasting and the LED grid also has surface mounting. All in all, just the right gadget to get a little creativity and a lot of technology right into the classroom. Photo Sources: Victor Keegan/Flickr, Marcie Casas/Flickr

The War Of Mini Computers: Will Micro:Bit Kill Raspberry Pi?

The BBC Micro:Bit, a matchbox-sized computer will be given to year seven students in the UK. For those wandering what the reach of this single board computer will be, and how Raspberry Pi (the other pint-sized computer) could be impacted, read on to know more. Find out whether mini computers are the answer or cause of health problems in the classroom too. The Features The Micro:Bit computer has 256 KB of flash and 16 KB of RAM. It was manufactured by element14. As far as the RAM is concerned, there is no way to compare it with the Acorn designed, three-decade old BBC Micro Model A. But if size is any predictor of success, the Micro:Bit could be just the thing educational technology needs.Like us on Facebook Artificial Intelligence: Scientists Developed a Handwriting Algorithm The Benefits Heavy lifting will become a thing of the past with this new micro-computer, reports the Register. As it is so small, and runs multiple apps and browsers as well as single programs, students will have a rich interface to use. This will also contribute towards differentiated learning, cognitive development and creativity in classrooms, according to Boundless.com. For a rich learning experience, students will not be left far behind because the interactive interface comes with lesson plans, array of code samples and videos. Know more and know it easily seems to be the USP of the Micro:Bit. For the smartphone generation, instant gratification of the Micro:Bit will even leave the Raspberry Pi behind, some reports say. Educational technology that reaches kids and does not have to be force fed to them would be a boon for the education sector. Apart from instant message processing, you get “event driven programming, loops, simple variables” as well as the “ability to make it complain if you pick it up.” For upping motivation levels in the study room, there is nothing quite like a new and exciting gadget. But the Register holds that Raspberry Pi would not get creamed as of yet, because it uses Linux which Micro:Bit does not. So what other features does this wonder gadget have? The runtime has a Device Abstraction Layer, meaning languages can be plugged into a jump table. Beginning programmers who don’t know the ABC of coding can use this device easily. It has two Cortex Micro Processing Units/MPUs to prevent problems during booting, communication and loading. The computer’s nordic semiconductor ARM context provides the capacity to use Bluetooth technology and execution of applications that are self contained. The power comes from AAA batteries which are almost everlasting and the LED grid also has surface mounting. All in all, just the right gadget to get a little creativity and a lot of technology right into the classroom. Photo Sources: Victor Keegan/Flickr, Marcie Casas/Flickr