Contact Lenses Alter Eye’s Natural Bacteria – Study

An emerging research warns that wearing contact lenses may alter the natural bacteria found in the eyes, making it more skin-like. Researchers from the New York University School of Medicine enrolled 58 participants in the study. Some were wearing contact lenses and some were not. They wanted to find out what was living inside the ocular microbiota of these people. James Ryan Morales | Health AimStretchable Nano-Device to Lead Development of Smart Contact Lenses Scientists obtain a swabbed specimen from the eyeball’s surface and area under the eye. They then sequenced the bacterial communities, according to Time.Like us on Facebook Results reveal that contact lenses altered the eye surface’s bacterial composition making it the same to the skin. This means that in comparison with non-lens wearers, people who wear contact lenses appeared to have a greater abundance of skin bacteria such as Acinetobacter, Lactobacillus, Methylbacterium and Pseudomonas and lower abundance of Corynebacterium, Haemophilus, Staphylococcus and Streptococcus. How bacteria are transferred from the skin to eyes, whether these “are transferred from the fingers to the lens and to the eye surface, or if the lenses exert selective pressures on the eye bacterial community in favor of the skin bacteria,” is not known yet. However, these are essential questions, noting that use of contact lenses has been associated with eye infections including giant papillary conjunctivitis and keratitis. “Wearing contact lenses is known to increase the risk of microbial keratitis and other inflammatory eye conditions,” Maria Dominguez-Bello, study author and New York University associate professor of medicine, wrote in an email. However, she stressed that further study are still needed to arrive at a definite conclusion if microbial changes could really compromise eye health. “When we can better understand the mechanisms, we will be able to test hypotheses and propose preventive measures,” she added. There are more than 30 million Americans who wear contact lenses, which is one-third of the estimated 100 million worldwide population, based on the US Food and Drug Administration’s statistics. Photo: Wikimedia

Contact Lenses Alter Eye’s Natural Bacteria – Study

An emerging research warns that wearing contact lenses may alter the natural bacteria found in the eyes, making it more skin-like. Researchers from the New York University School of Medicine enrolled 58 participants in the study. Some were wearing contact lenses and some were not. They wanted to find out what was living inside the ocular microbiota of these people. James Ryan Morales | Health AimStretchable Nano-Device to Lead Development of Smart Contact Lenses Scientists obtain a swabbed specimen from the eyeball’s surface and area under the eye. They then sequenced the bacterial communities, according to Time.Like us on Facebook Results reveal that contact lenses altered the eye surface’s bacterial composition making it the same to the skin. This means that in comparison with non-lens wearers, people who wear contact lenses appeared to have a greater abundance of skin bacteria such as Acinetobacter, Lactobacillus, Methylbacterium and Pseudomonas and lower abundance of Corynebacterium, Haemophilus, Staphylococcus and Streptococcus. How bacteria are transferred from the skin to eyes, whether these “are transferred from the fingers to the lens and to the eye surface, or if the lenses exert selective pressures on the eye bacterial community in favor of the skin bacteria,” is not known yet. However, these are essential questions, noting that use of contact lenses has been associated with eye infections including giant papillary conjunctivitis and keratitis. “Wearing contact lenses is known to increase the risk of microbial keratitis and other inflammatory eye conditions,” Maria Dominguez-Bello, study author and New York University associate professor of medicine, wrote in an email. However, she stressed that further study are still needed to arrive at a definite conclusion if microbial changes could really compromise eye health. “When we can better understand the mechanisms, we will be able to test hypotheses and propose preventive measures,” she added. There are more than 30 million Americans who wear contact lenses, which is one-third of the estimated 100 million worldwide population, based on the US Food and Drug Administration’s statistics. Photo: Wikimedia

Contact Lenses Alter Eye’s Natural Bacteria – Study

An emerging research warns that wearing contact lenses may alter the natural bacteria found in the eyes, making it more skin-like. Researchers from the New York University School of Medicine enrolled 58 participants in the study. Some were wearing contact lenses and some were not. They wanted to find out what was living inside the ocular microbiota of these people. James Ryan Morales | Health AimStretchable Nano-Device to Lead Development of Smart Contact Lenses Scientists obtain a swabbed specimen from the eyeball’s surface and area under the eye. They then sequenced the bacterial communities, according to Time.Like us on Facebook Results reveal that contact lenses altered the eye surface’s bacterial composition making it the same to the skin. This means that in comparison with non-lens wearers, people who wear contact lenses appeared to have a greater abundance of skin bacteria such as Acinetobacter, Lactobacillus, Methylbacterium and Pseudomonas and lower abundance of Corynebacterium, Haemophilus, Staphylococcus and Streptococcus. How bacteria are transferred from the skin to eyes, whether these “are transferred from the fingers to the lens and to the eye surface, or if the lenses exert selective pressures on the eye bacterial community in favor of the skin bacteria,” is not known yet. However, these are essential questions, noting that use of contact lenses has been associated with eye infections including giant papillary conjunctivitis and keratitis. “Wearing contact lenses is known to increase the risk of microbial keratitis and other inflammatory eye conditions,” Maria Dominguez-Bello, study author and New York University associate professor of medicine, wrote in an email. However, she stressed that further study are still needed to arrive at a definite conclusion if microbial changes could really compromise eye health. “When we can better understand the mechanisms, we will be able to test hypotheses and propose preventive measures,” she added. There are more than 30 million Americans who wear contact lenses, which is one-third of the estimated 100 million worldwide population, based on the US Food and Drug Administration’s statistics. Photo: Wikimedia

Contact Lenses Alter Eye’s Natural Bacteria – Study

An emerging research warns that wearing contact lenses may alter the natural bacteria found in the eyes, making it more skin-like. Researchers from the New York University School of Medicine enrolled 58 participants in the study. Some were wearing contact lenses and some were not. They wanted to find out what was living inside the ocular microbiota of these people. James Ryan Morales | Health AimStretchable Nano-Device to Lead Development of Smart Contact Lenses Scientists obtain a swabbed specimen from the eyeball’s surface and area under the eye. They then sequenced the bacterial communities, according to Time.Like us on Facebook Results reveal that contact lenses altered the eye surface’s bacterial composition making it the same to the skin. This means that in comparison with non-lens wearers, people who wear contact lenses appeared to have a greater abundance of skin bacteria such as Acinetobacter, Lactobacillus, Methylbacterium and Pseudomonas and lower abundance of Corynebacterium, Haemophilus, Staphylococcus and Streptococcus. How bacteria are transferred from the skin to eyes, whether these “are transferred from the fingers to the lens and to the eye surface, or if the lenses exert selective pressures on the eye bacterial community in favor of the skin bacteria,” is not known yet. However, these are essential questions, noting that use of contact lenses has been associated with eye infections including giant papillary conjunctivitis and keratitis. “Wearing contact lenses is known to increase the risk of microbial keratitis and other inflammatory eye conditions,” Maria Dominguez-Bello, study author and New York University associate professor of medicine, wrote in an email. However, she stressed that further study are still needed to arrive at a definite conclusion if microbial changes could really compromise eye health. “When we can better understand the mechanisms, we will be able to test hypotheses and propose preventive measures,” she added. There are more than 30 million Americans who wear contact lenses, which is one-third of the estimated 100 million worldwide population, based on the US Food and Drug Administration’s statistics. Photo: Wikimedia

Contact Lenses Alter Eye’s Natural Bacteria – Study

An emerging research warns that wearing contact lenses may alter the natural bacteria found in the eyes, making it more skin-like. Researchers from the New York University School of Medicine enrolled 58 participants in the study. Some were wearing contact lenses and some were not. They wanted to find out what was living inside the ocular microbiota of these people. James Ryan Morales | Health AimStretchable Nano-Device to Lead Development of Smart Contact Lenses Scientists obtain a swabbed specimen from the eyeball’s surface and area under the eye. They then sequenced the bacterial communities, according to Time.Like us on Facebook Results reveal that contact lenses altered the eye surface’s bacterial composition making it the same to the skin. This means that in comparison with non-lens wearers, people who wear contact lenses appeared to have a greater abundance of skin bacteria such as Acinetobacter, Lactobacillus, Methylbacterium and Pseudomonas and lower abundance of Corynebacterium, Haemophilus, Staphylococcus and Streptococcus. How bacteria are transferred from the skin to eyes, whether these “are transferred from the fingers to the lens and to the eye surface, or if the lenses exert selective pressures on the eye bacterial community in favor of the skin bacteria,” is not known yet. However, these are essential questions, noting that use of contact lenses has been associated with eye infections including giant papillary conjunctivitis and keratitis. “Wearing contact lenses is known to increase the risk of microbial keratitis and other inflammatory eye conditions,” Maria Dominguez-Bello, study author and New York University associate professor of medicine, wrote in an email. However, she stressed that further study are still needed to arrive at a definite conclusion if microbial changes could really compromise eye health. “When we can better understand the mechanisms, we will be able to test hypotheses and propose preventive measures,” she added. There are more than 30 million Americans who wear contact lenses, which is one-third of the estimated 100 million worldwide population, based on the US Food and Drug Administration’s statistics. Photo: Wikimedia

Contact Lenses Alter Eye’s Natural Bacteria – Study

An emerging research warns that wearing contact lenses may alter the natural bacteria found in the eyes, making it more skin-like. Researchers from the New York University School of Medicine enrolled 58 participants in the study. Some were wearing contact lenses and some were not. They wanted to find out what was living inside the ocular microbiota of these people. James Ryan Morales | Health AimStretchable Nano-Device to Lead Development of Smart Contact Lenses Scientists obtain a swabbed specimen from the eyeball’s surface and area under the eye. They then sequenced the bacterial communities, according to Time.Like us on Facebook Results reveal that contact lenses altered the eye surface’s bacterial composition making it the same to the skin. This means that in comparison with non-lens wearers, people who wear contact lenses appeared to have a greater abundance of skin bacteria such as Acinetobacter, Lactobacillus, Methylbacterium and Pseudomonas and lower abundance of Corynebacterium, Haemophilus, Staphylococcus and Streptococcus. How bacteria are transferred from the skin to eyes, whether these “are transferred from the fingers to the lens and to the eye surface, or if the lenses exert selective pressures on the eye bacterial community in favor of the skin bacteria,” is not known yet. However, these are essential questions, noting that use of contact lenses has been associated with eye infections including giant papillary conjunctivitis and keratitis. “Wearing contact lenses is known to increase the risk of microbial keratitis and other inflammatory eye conditions,” Maria Dominguez-Bello, study author and New York University associate professor of medicine, wrote in an email. However, she stressed that further study are still needed to arrive at a definite conclusion if microbial changes could really compromise eye health. “When we can better understand the mechanisms, we will be able to test hypotheses and propose preventive measures,” she added. There are more than 30 million Americans who wear contact lenses, which is one-third of the estimated 100 million worldwide population, based on the US Food and Drug Administration’s statistics. Photo: Wikimedia

Contact Lenses Alter Eye’s Natural Bacteria – Study

An emerging research warns that wearing contact lenses may alter the natural bacteria found in the eyes, making it more skin-like. Researchers from the New York University School of Medicine enrolled 58 participants in the study. Some were wearing contact lenses and some were not. They wanted to find out what was living inside the ocular microbiota of these people. James Ryan Morales | Health AimStretchable Nano-Device to Lead Development of Smart Contact Lenses Scientists obtain a swabbed specimen from the eyeball’s surface and area under the eye. They then sequenced the bacterial communities, according to Time.Like us on Facebook Results reveal that contact lenses altered the eye surface’s bacterial composition making it the same to the skin. This means that in comparison with non-lens wearers, people who wear contact lenses appeared to have a greater abundance of skin bacteria such as Acinetobacter, Lactobacillus, Methylbacterium and Pseudomonas and lower abundance of Corynebacterium, Haemophilus, Staphylococcus and Streptococcus. How bacteria are transferred from the skin to eyes, whether these “are transferred from the fingers to the lens and to the eye surface, or if the lenses exert selective pressures on the eye bacterial community in favor of the skin bacteria,” is not known yet. However, these are essential questions, noting that use of contact lenses has been associated with eye infections including giant papillary conjunctivitis and keratitis. “Wearing contact lenses is known to increase the risk of microbial keratitis and other inflammatory eye conditions,” Maria Dominguez-Bello, study author and New York University associate professor of medicine, wrote in an email. However, she stressed that further study are still needed to arrive at a definite conclusion if microbial changes could really compromise eye health. “When we can better understand the mechanisms, we will be able to test hypotheses and propose preventive measures,” she added. There are more than 30 million Americans who wear contact lenses, which is one-third of the estimated 100 million worldwide population, based on the US Food and Drug Administration’s statistics. Photo: Wikimedia

Contact Lenses Alter Eye’s Natural Bacteria – Study

An emerging research warns that wearing contact lenses may alter the natural bacteria found in the eyes, making it more skin-like. Researchers from the New York University School of Medicine enrolled 58 participants in the study. Some were wearing contact lenses and some were not. They wanted to find out what was living inside the ocular microbiota of these people. James Ryan Morales | Health AimStretchable Nano-Device to Lead Development of Smart Contact Lenses Scientists obtain a swabbed specimen from the eyeball’s surface and area under the eye. They then sequenced the bacterial communities, according to Time.Like us on Facebook Results reveal that contact lenses altered the eye surface’s bacterial composition making it the same to the skin. This means that in comparison with non-lens wearers, people who wear contact lenses appeared to have a greater abundance of skin bacteria such as Acinetobacter, Lactobacillus, Methylbacterium and Pseudomonas and lower abundance of Corynebacterium, Haemophilus, Staphylococcus and Streptococcus. How bacteria are transferred from the skin to eyes, whether these “are transferred from the fingers to the lens and to the eye surface, or if the lenses exert selective pressures on the eye bacterial community in favor of the skin bacteria,” is not known yet. However, these are essential questions, noting that use of contact lenses has been associated with eye infections including giant papillary conjunctivitis and keratitis. “Wearing contact lenses is known to increase the risk of microbial keratitis and other inflammatory eye conditions,” Maria Dominguez-Bello, study author and New York University associate professor of medicine, wrote in an email. However, she stressed that further study are still needed to arrive at a definite conclusion if microbial changes could really compromise eye health. “When we can better understand the mechanisms, we will be able to test hypotheses and propose preventive measures,” she added. There are more than 30 million Americans who wear contact lenses, which is one-third of the estimated 100 million worldwide population, based on the US Food and Drug Administration’s statistics. Photo: Wikimedia

Contact Lenses Alter Eye’s Natural Bacteria – Study

An emerging research warns that wearing contact lenses may alter the natural bacteria found in the eyes, making it more skin-like. Researchers from the New York University School of Medicine enrolled 58 participants in the study. Some were wearing contact lenses and some were not. They wanted to find out what was living inside the ocular microbiota of these people. James Ryan Morales | Health AimStretchable Nano-Device to Lead Development of Smart Contact Lenses Scientists obtain a swabbed specimen from the eyeball’s surface and area under the eye. They then sequenced the bacterial communities, according to Time.Like us on Facebook Results reveal that contact lenses altered the eye surface’s bacterial composition making it the same to the skin. This means that in comparison with non-lens wearers, people who wear contact lenses appeared to have a greater abundance of skin bacteria such as Acinetobacter, Lactobacillus, Methylbacterium and Pseudomonas and lower abundance of Corynebacterium, Haemophilus, Staphylococcus and Streptococcus. How bacteria are transferred from the skin to eyes, whether these “are transferred from the fingers to the lens and to the eye surface, or if the lenses exert selective pressures on the eye bacterial community in favor of the skin bacteria,” is not known yet. However, these are essential questions, noting that use of contact lenses has been associated with eye infections including giant papillary conjunctivitis and keratitis. “Wearing contact lenses is known to increase the risk of microbial keratitis and other inflammatory eye conditions,” Maria Dominguez-Bello, study author and New York University associate professor of medicine, wrote in an email. However, she stressed that further study are still needed to arrive at a definite conclusion if microbial changes could really compromise eye health. “When we can better understand the mechanisms, we will be able to test hypotheses and propose preventive measures,” she added. There are more than 30 million Americans who wear contact lenses, which is one-third of the estimated 100 million worldwide population, based on the US Food and Drug Administration’s statistics. Photo: Wikimedia

Contact Lenses Alter Eye’s Natural Bacteria – Study

An emerging research warns that wearing contact lenses may alter the natural bacteria found in the eyes, making it more skin-like. Researchers from the New York University School of Medicine enrolled 58 participants in the study. Some were wearing contact lenses and some were not. They wanted to find out what was living inside the ocular microbiota of these people. James Ryan Morales | Health AimStretchable Nano-Device to Lead Development of Smart Contact Lenses Scientists obtain a swabbed specimen from the eyeball’s surface and area under the eye. They then sequenced the bacterial communities, according to Time.Like us on Facebook Results reveal that contact lenses altered the eye surface’s bacterial composition making it the same to the skin. This means that in comparison with non-lens wearers, people who wear contact lenses appeared to have a greater abundance of skin bacteria such as Acinetobacter, Lactobacillus, Methylbacterium and Pseudomonas and lower abundance of Corynebacterium, Haemophilus, Staphylococcus and Streptococcus. How bacteria are transferred from the skin to eyes, whether these “are transferred from the fingers to the lens and to the eye surface, or if the lenses exert selective pressures on the eye bacterial community in favor of the skin bacteria,” is not known yet. However, these are essential questions, noting that use of contact lenses has been associated with eye infections including giant papillary conjunctivitis and keratitis. “Wearing contact lenses is known to increase the risk of microbial keratitis and other inflammatory eye conditions,” Maria Dominguez-Bello, study author and New York University associate professor of medicine, wrote in an email. However, she stressed that further study are still needed to arrive at a definite conclusion if microbial changes could really compromise eye health. “When we can better understand the mechanisms, we will be able to test hypotheses and propose preventive measures,” she added. There are more than 30 million Americans who wear contact lenses, which is one-third of the estimated 100 million worldwide population, based on the US Food and Drug Administration’s statistics. Photo: Wikimedia