Substance Abuse: Drug Addiction Facts

Substance abuse is defined as the excessive use of a substance, especially alcohol or a drug. Substance abuse is a pandemic in the United States. From the abuse of seemingly innocent substances such as marijuana and alcohol to the abuse of street drugs like cocaine and heroin, substance abuse costs individuals substantially, and it costs the nation as a whole. According to WebMD, abused substances produce some form of intoxication that alters judgment, perception, attention, or physical control. While various street drugs are known to be dangerous, such as heroin and crystal meth, prescription drugs are often viewed in a more favorable light, due to their status as being doctor-prescribed. Though many believe these drugs are “safer” as a result, they can be as addictive as heroin. The many different types and classifications of drugs produce a variety of short-term effects, but the most common ones include increased heart rate, high blood pressure, dizziness, tremors, mood changes and paranoia. In the long-term, substance abuse may lead to mental and physical effects that will require treatment to resolve. These effects can include; paranoia, psychosis, immune deficiencies and organ damage.Like us on Facebook While substance abuse comes with many side effects, ranging from mild physical side effects like nausea and dehydration to work-related consequences such as reduced productivity, one of the greatest risks of substance abuse is dependence. Most people who struggle with drug addiction face the issue of tolerance buildup. After continuous use, the body becomes less and less stimulated by the drug. This may cause a person to begin using higher dosages to obtain the same high. This will lead to drug overdose. Signs and symptoms of a drug overdose include: 1. Losing consciousness.
2. Fever or sweating.
3. Breathing problems.
4. Abnormal pulse.
5. Change in skin color. Child Abuse Victims: Mental Health Needs More Attention Rehab and addiction treatment options A doctor can help each individual find the right rehabilitation or treatment option. The setting is determined by individual needs, so some people may benefit from an inpatient rehab, while others may thrive by using an outpatient program. At the core, the goal is to help a former addict assimilate into a drug-free life as easily as possible. The most commonly used treatment options for addiction include: 1. Psychotherapy, which helps patients learn how to resist and redirect compulsions.
2. Support groups
3. Individual counseling Photo: Wikimedia

Substance Abuse: Drug Addiction Facts

Substance abuse is defined as the excessive use of a substance, especially alcohol or a drug. Substance abuse is a pandemic in the United States. From the abuse of seemingly innocent substances such as marijuana and alcohol to the abuse of street drugs like cocaine and heroin, substance abuse costs individuals substantially, and it costs the nation as a whole. According to WebMD, abused substances produce some form of intoxication that alters judgment, perception, attention, or physical control. While various street drugs are known to be dangerous, such as heroin and crystal meth, prescription drugs are often viewed in a more favorable light, due to their status as being doctor-prescribed. Though many believe these drugs are “safer” as a result, they can be as addictive as heroin. The many different types and classifications of drugs produce a variety of short-term effects, but the most common ones include increased heart rate, high blood pressure, dizziness, tremors, mood changes and paranoia. In the long-term, substance abuse may lead to mental and physical effects that will require treatment to resolve. These effects can include; paranoia, psychosis, immune deficiencies and organ damage.Like us on Facebook While substance abuse comes with many side effects, ranging from mild physical side effects like nausea and dehydration to work-related consequences such as reduced productivity, one of the greatest risks of substance abuse is dependence. Most people who struggle with drug addiction face the issue of tolerance buildup. After continuous use, the body becomes less and less stimulated by the drug. This may cause a person to begin using higher dosages to obtain the same high. This will lead to drug overdose. Signs and symptoms of a drug overdose include: 1. Losing consciousness.
2. Fever or sweating.
3. Breathing problems.
4. Abnormal pulse.
5. Change in skin color. Child Abuse Victims: Mental Health Needs More Attention Rehab and addiction treatment options A doctor can help each individual find the right rehabilitation or treatment option. The setting is determined by individual needs, so some people may benefit from an inpatient rehab, while others may thrive by using an outpatient program. At the core, the goal is to help a former addict assimilate into a drug-free life as easily as possible. The most commonly used treatment options for addiction include: 1. Psychotherapy, which helps patients learn how to resist and redirect compulsions.
2. Support groups
3. Individual counseling Photo: Wikimedia

Substance Abuse: Drug Addiction Facts

Substance abuse is defined as the excessive use of a substance, especially alcohol or a drug. Substance abuse is a pandemic in the United States. From the abuse of seemingly innocent substances such as marijuana and alcohol to the abuse of street drugs like cocaine and heroin, substance abuse costs individuals substantially, and it costs the nation as a whole. According to WebMD, abused substances produce some form of intoxication that alters judgment, perception, attention, or physical control. While various street drugs are known to be dangerous, such as heroin and crystal meth, prescription drugs are often viewed in a more favorable light, due to their status as being doctor-prescribed. Though many believe these drugs are “safer” as a result, they can be as addictive as heroin. The many different types and classifications of drugs produce a variety of short-term effects, but the most common ones include increased heart rate, high blood pressure, dizziness, tremors, mood changes and paranoia. In the long-term, substance abuse may lead to mental and physical effects that will require treatment to resolve. These effects can include; paranoia, psychosis, immune deficiencies and organ damage.Like us on Facebook While substance abuse comes with many side effects, ranging from mild physical side effects like nausea and dehydration to work-related consequences such as reduced productivity, one of the greatest risks of substance abuse is dependence. Most people who struggle with drug addiction face the issue of tolerance buildup. After continuous use, the body becomes less and less stimulated by the drug. This may cause a person to begin using higher dosages to obtain the same high. This will lead to drug overdose. Signs and symptoms of a drug overdose include: 1. Losing consciousness.
2. Fever or sweating.
3. Breathing problems.
4. Abnormal pulse.
5. Change in skin color. Child Abuse Victims: Mental Health Needs More Attention Rehab and addiction treatment options A doctor can help each individual find the right rehabilitation or treatment option. The setting is determined by individual needs, so some people may benefit from an inpatient rehab, while others may thrive by using an outpatient program. At the core, the goal is to help a former addict assimilate into a drug-free life as easily as possible. The most commonly used treatment options for addiction include: 1. Psychotherapy, which helps patients learn how to resist and redirect compulsions.
2. Support groups
3. Individual counseling Photo: Wikimedia

Substance Abuse: Drug Addiction Facts

Substance abuse is defined as the excessive use of a substance, especially alcohol or a drug. Substance abuse is a pandemic in the United States. From the abuse of seemingly innocent substances such as marijuana and alcohol to the abuse of street drugs like cocaine and heroin, substance abuse costs individuals substantially, and it costs the nation as a whole. According to WebMD, abused substances produce some form of intoxication that alters judgment, perception, attention, or physical control. While various street drugs are known to be dangerous, such as heroin and crystal meth, prescription drugs are often viewed in a more favorable light, due to their status as being doctor-prescribed. Though many believe these drugs are “safer” as a result, they can be as addictive as heroin. The many different types and classifications of drugs produce a variety of short-term effects, but the most common ones include increased heart rate, high blood pressure, dizziness, tremors, mood changes and paranoia. In the long-term, substance abuse may lead to mental and physical effects that will require treatment to resolve. These effects can include; paranoia, psychosis, immune deficiencies and organ damage.Like us on Facebook While substance abuse comes with many side effects, ranging from mild physical side effects like nausea and dehydration to work-related consequences such as reduced productivity, one of the greatest risks of substance abuse is dependence. Most people who struggle with drug addiction face the issue of tolerance buildup. After continuous use, the body becomes less and less stimulated by the drug. This may cause a person to begin using higher dosages to obtain the same high. This will lead to drug overdose. Signs and symptoms of a drug overdose include: 1. Losing consciousness.
2. Fever or sweating.
3. Breathing problems.
4. Abnormal pulse.
5. Change in skin color. Child Abuse Victims: Mental Health Needs More Attention Rehab and addiction treatment options A doctor can help each individual find the right rehabilitation or treatment option. The setting is determined by individual needs, so some people may benefit from an inpatient rehab, while others may thrive by using an outpatient program. At the core, the goal is to help a former addict assimilate into a drug-free life as easily as possible. The most commonly used treatment options for addiction include: 1. Psychotherapy, which helps patients learn how to resist and redirect compulsions.
2. Support groups
3. Individual counseling Photo: Wikimedia

Substance Abuse: Drug Addiction Facts

Substance abuse is defined as the excessive use of a substance, especially alcohol or a drug. Substance abuse is a pandemic in the United States. From the abuse of seemingly innocent substances such as marijuana and alcohol to the abuse of street drugs like cocaine and heroin, substance abuse costs individuals substantially, and it costs the nation as a whole. According to WebMD, abused substances produce some form of intoxication that alters judgment, perception, attention, or physical control. While various street drugs are known to be dangerous, such as heroin and crystal meth, prescription drugs are often viewed in a more favorable light, due to their status as being doctor-prescribed. Though many believe these drugs are “safer” as a result, they can be as addictive as heroin. The many different types and classifications of drugs produce a variety of short-term effects, but the most common ones include increased heart rate, high blood pressure, dizziness, tremors, mood changes and paranoia. In the long-term, substance abuse may lead to mental and physical effects that will require treatment to resolve. These effects can include; paranoia, psychosis, immune deficiencies and organ damage.Like us on Facebook While substance abuse comes with many side effects, ranging from mild physical side effects like nausea and dehydration to work-related consequences such as reduced productivity, one of the greatest risks of substance abuse is dependence. Most people who struggle with drug addiction face the issue of tolerance buildup. After continuous use, the body becomes less and less stimulated by the drug. This may cause a person to begin using higher dosages to obtain the same high. This will lead to drug overdose. Signs and symptoms of a drug overdose include: 1. Losing consciousness.
2. Fever or sweating.
3. Breathing problems.
4. Abnormal pulse.
5. Change in skin color. Child Abuse Victims: Mental Health Needs More Attention Rehab and addiction treatment options A doctor can help each individual find the right rehabilitation or treatment option. The setting is determined by individual needs, so some people may benefit from an inpatient rehab, while others may thrive by using an outpatient program. At the core, the goal is to help a former addict assimilate into a drug-free life as easily as possible. The most commonly used treatment options for addiction include: 1. Psychotherapy, which helps patients learn how to resist and redirect compulsions.
2. Support groups
3. Individual counseling Photo: Wikimedia

IR Opioid Medication Gets Enhanced Warning Labeling By FDA

Opioid medication for pain has become one of the major issue of concern in the US due to the abuse that has come to be related to it. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has thus decided to make changes in class-wise labeling with regard to immediate release (IR) Opioids. The changes proposed by FDA includes the IR Opioids being released with a boxed warning that talk about the risk related to overuse, abuse and addiction to these Opioid medication. As part of the on-going efforts related to reversing the trend of Opioid addiction, FDA intends to educate the people while still retaining the use of the medicines for pain relief to the deserving. “Opioid addiction and overdose have reached epidemic levels over the past decade, and the FDA remains steadfast in our commitment to do our part to help reverse the devastating impact of the misuse and abuse of prescription opioids,” said Robert Califf, M.D., FDA commissioner. What is Opioid medication? Opioids pain relievers usually include hydrocodone, Oxycodone and Morphine etc in their prescription form. These opioids usually come in two categories and are prescribed accordingly.Like us on Facebook Pixabay Painkiller Abusers Turning To Heroin The ones that are part of Immediate Release products are taken every 4 to 6 hours. Meanwhile, the ones that are prescribed from the extended-release/long-acting group are taken just once or twice a day. Besides, there is another group of Opoids that includes buprenorphine and methadone which are also used in treatment of people with opoid addiction. As such, the FDA has made it very clear as to how and when the administration of opoids is required and especially with respect to the IR Opioids the regulations are being made very stringent. In fact, use of opoids during pregnancy can cause a kind of depression named neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome (NOWS) that could be very dangerous to the new born baby. “We know that there is persistent abuse, addiction, overdose mortality and risk of NOWS associated with IR opioid products,” said Douglas Throckmorton, M.D., deputy center director of regulatory programs, FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “Today, we have taken an important next step in clarifying and making more prominent the known risks of IR opioid medications.” Photo: Pixabay, Pixabay

Substance Abuse: Drug Addiction Facts

Substance abuse is defined as the excessive use of a substance, especially alcohol or a drug. Substance abuse is a pandemic in the United States. From the abuse of seemingly innocent substances such as marijuana and alcohol to the abuse of street drugs like cocaine and heroin, substance abuse costs individuals substantially, and it costs the nation as a whole. According to WebMD, abused substances produce some form of intoxication that alters judgment, perception, attention, or physical control. While various street drugs are known to be dangerous, such as heroin and crystal meth, prescription drugs are often viewed in a more favorable light, due to their status as being doctor-prescribed. Though many believe these drugs are “safer” as a result, they can be as addictive as heroin. The many different types and classifications of drugs produce a variety of short-term effects, but the most common ones include increased heart rate, high blood pressure, dizziness, tremors, mood changes and paranoia. In the long-term, substance abuse may lead to mental and physical effects that will require treatment to resolve. These effects can include; paranoia, psychosis, immune deficiencies and organ damage.Like us on Facebook While substance abuse comes with many side effects, ranging from mild physical side effects like nausea and dehydration to work-related consequences such as reduced productivity, one of the greatest risks of substance abuse is dependence. Most people who struggle with drug addiction face the issue of tolerance buildup. After continuous use, the body becomes less and less stimulated by the drug. This may cause a person to begin using higher dosages to obtain the same high. This will lead to drug overdose. Signs and symptoms of a drug overdose include: 1. Losing consciousness.
2. Fever or sweating.
3. Breathing problems.
4. Abnormal pulse.
5. Change in skin color. Child Abuse Victims: Mental Health Needs More Attention Rehab and addiction treatment options A doctor can help each individual find the right rehabilitation or treatment option. The setting is determined by individual needs, so some people may benefit from an inpatient rehab, while others may thrive by using an outpatient program. At the core, the goal is to help a former addict assimilate into a drug-free life as easily as possible. The most commonly used treatment options for addiction include: 1. Psychotherapy, which helps patients learn how to resist and redirect compulsions.
2. Support groups
3. Individual counseling Photo: Wikimedia

Substance Abuse: Drug Addiction Facts

Substance abuse is defined as the excessive use of a substance, especially alcohol or a drug. Substance abuse is a pandemic in the United States. From the abuse of seemingly innocent substances such as marijuana and alcohol to the abuse of street drugs like cocaine and heroin, substance abuse costs individuals substantially, and it costs the nation as a whole. According to WebMD, abused substances produce some form of intoxication that alters judgment, perception, attention, or physical control. While various street drugs are known to be dangerous, such as heroin and crystal meth, prescription drugs are often viewed in a more favorable light, due to their status as being doctor-prescribed. Though many believe these drugs are “safer” as a result, they can be as addictive as heroin. The many different types and classifications of drugs produce a variety of short-term effects, but the most common ones include increased heart rate, high blood pressure, dizziness, tremors, mood changes and paranoia. In the long-term, substance abuse may lead to mental and physical effects that will require treatment to resolve. These effects can include; paranoia, psychosis, immune deficiencies and organ damage.Like us on Facebook While substance abuse comes with many side effects, ranging from mild physical side effects like nausea and dehydration to work-related consequences such as reduced productivity, one of the greatest risks of substance abuse is dependence. Most people who struggle with drug addiction face the issue of tolerance buildup. After continuous use, the body becomes less and less stimulated by the drug. This may cause a person to begin using higher dosages to obtain the same high. This will lead to drug overdose. Signs and symptoms of a drug overdose include: 1. Losing consciousness.
2. Fever or sweating.
3. Breathing problems.
4. Abnormal pulse.
5. Change in skin color. Child Abuse Victims: Mental Health Needs More Attention Rehab and addiction treatment options A doctor can help each individual find the right rehabilitation or treatment option. The setting is determined by individual needs, so some people may benefit from an inpatient rehab, while others may thrive by using an outpatient program. At the core, the goal is to help a former addict assimilate into a drug-free life as easily as possible. The most commonly used treatment options for addiction include: 1. Psychotherapy, which helps patients learn how to resist and redirect compulsions.
2. Support groups
3. Individual counseling Photo: Wikimedia

Substance Abuse: Drug Addiction Facts

Substance abuse is defined as the excessive use of a substance, especially alcohol or a drug. Substance abuse is a pandemic in the United States. From the abuse of seemingly innocent substances such as marijuana and alcohol to the abuse of street drugs like cocaine and heroin, substance abuse costs individuals substantially, and it costs the nation as a whole. According to WebMD, abused substances produce some form of intoxication that alters judgment, perception, attention, or physical control. While various street drugs are known to be dangerous, such as heroin and crystal meth, prescription drugs are often viewed in a more favorable light, due to their status as being doctor-prescribed. Though many believe these drugs are “safer” as a result, they can be as addictive as heroin. The many different types and classifications of drugs produce a variety of short-term effects, but the most common ones include increased heart rate, high blood pressure, dizziness, tremors, mood changes and paranoia. In the long-term, substance abuse may lead to mental and physical effects that will require treatment to resolve. These effects can include; paranoia, psychosis, immune deficiencies and organ damage.Like us on Facebook While substance abuse comes with many side effects, ranging from mild physical side effects like nausea and dehydration to work-related consequences such as reduced productivity, one of the greatest risks of substance abuse is dependence. Most people who struggle with drug addiction face the issue of tolerance buildup. After continuous use, the body becomes less and less stimulated by the drug. This may cause a person to begin using higher dosages to obtain the same high. This will lead to drug overdose. Signs and symptoms of a drug overdose include: 1. Losing consciousness.
2. Fever or sweating.
3. Breathing problems.
4. Abnormal pulse.
5. Change in skin color. Child Abuse Victims: Mental Health Needs More Attention Rehab and addiction treatment options A doctor can help each individual find the right rehabilitation or treatment option. The setting is determined by individual needs, so some people may benefit from an inpatient rehab, while others may thrive by using an outpatient program. At the core, the goal is to help a former addict assimilate into a drug-free life as easily as possible. The most commonly used treatment options for addiction include: 1. Psychotherapy, which helps patients learn how to resist and redirect compulsions.
2. Support groups
3. Individual counseling Photo: Wikimedia

IR Opioid Medication Gets Enhanced Warning Labeling By FDA

Opioid medication for pain has become one of the major issue of concern in the US due to the abuse that has come to be related to it. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has thus decided to make changes in class-wise labeling with regard to immediate release (IR) Opioids. The changes proposed by FDA includes the IR Opioids being released with a boxed warning that talk about the risk related to overuse, abuse and addiction to these Opioid medication. As part of the on-going efforts related to reversing the trend of Opioid addiction, FDA intends to educate the people while still retaining the use of the medicines for pain relief to the deserving. “Opioid addiction and overdose have reached epidemic levels over the past decade, and the FDA remains steadfast in our commitment to do our part to help reverse the devastating impact of the misuse and abuse of prescription opioids,” said Robert Califf, M.D., FDA commissioner. What is Opioid medication? Opioids pain relievers usually include hydrocodone, Oxycodone and Morphine etc in their prescription form. These opioids usually come in two categories and are prescribed accordingly.Like us on Facebook Pixabay Painkiller Abusers Turning To Heroin The ones that are part of Immediate Release products are taken every 4 to 6 hours. Meanwhile, the ones that are prescribed from the extended-release/long-acting group are taken just once or twice a day. Besides, there is another group of Opoids that includes buprenorphine and methadone which are also used in treatment of people with opoid addiction. As such, the FDA has made it very clear as to how and when the administration of opoids is required and especially with respect to the IR Opioids the regulations are being made very stringent. In fact, use of opoids during pregnancy can cause a kind of depression named neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome (NOWS) that could be very dangerous to the new born baby. “We know that there is persistent abuse, addiction, overdose mortality and risk of NOWS associated with IR opioid products,” said Douglas Throckmorton, M.D., deputy center director of regulatory programs, FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “Today, we have taken an important next step in clarifying and making more prominent the known risks of IR opioid medications.” Photo: Pixabay, Pixabay