The Sound Of Calories: Food Tracking Necklace “Listens” To What You Eat

When each food item is chewed, it has its own voice? That is the basic premise of the high tech, food tracking necklace by researchers from the University of Buffalo. UB scientists along with North Eastern University, China are revolutionizing nutrition mapping. Now, even the way you chew could be a clue to your caloric intake with the development of a new wearable technology called AutoDietary. Unique sounds are made when we bite, swallow and grind food. This is how AutoDietary, a food tracking necklace works. It monitors calorific intake rather than calories burned. McDonald’s Salad has More Calories Than A Big Mac!  Like us on Facebook AutoDietary can be worn around the neck and it has a mic which records sounds made when chewing. As food is swallowed, data are sent to a smartphone via Bluetooth. On the basis of this, food types are recognized. The device has already been tested on 13 to 49 year-old test subjects. During the study, the subjects ate six types of food and drank beverages. Results, published in IEEE Sensors Journal, show AutoDietary was able to identify sounds 85 percent of the time. Researchers said the device would help people suffering from certain diseases. Those with diabetes, bowel disorders and stomach problems can monitor food intake through this novel necklace. The wearable necklace works by matching the sounds against a catalog. Keeping an eye on what you eat was never easier. Doing away with the food journal and the weighing scale, this necklace lets you monitor what you eat. UB’s Assistant Professor of Computer Science at the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Wenyao Xu has also come up with the world’s “first sound library.” This library helps to find out what the wearer is chewing or gulping. However, AutoDietary has limits too. It cannot distinguish between similar foods. So, if you are swallowing soup or chili, this necklace would be hard pressed to know the difference. In addition, it can’t make out the ingredients of complex food items either. But Xu is working on a biomonitoring device to help AutoDietary. This device will check food value through measurements like blood sugar levels. Suggestions for healthier eating will also be provided through this system. The researchers are hoping to refine the necklace and make it more accurate. They aim to allow users to see how much sugar, fat etc has been taken in. It would also assess how food is metabolized by the body. According to Gizmodo, the team will continue to grow the library. From regular calorie counters and weight watches to diabetics, the necklace has value for many. This food feedback system may have a long way to go, but it has made a good start. Photo Sources: CarriageHouse2011/Flickr, Lisa/Flickr

The Sound Of Calories: Food Tracking Necklace “Listens” To What You Eat

When each food item is chewed, it has its own voice? That is the basic premise of the high tech, food tracking necklace by researchers from the University of Buffalo. UB scientists along with North Eastern University, China are revolutionizing nutrition mapping. Now, even the way you chew could be a clue to your caloric intake with the development of a new wearable technology called AutoDietary. Unique sounds are made when we bite, swallow and grind food. This is how AutoDietary, a food tracking necklace works. It monitors calorific intake rather than calories burned. McDonald’s Salad has More Calories Than A Big Mac!  Like us on Facebook AutoDietary can be worn around the neck and it has a mic which records sounds made when chewing. As food is swallowed, data are sent to a smartphone via Bluetooth. On the basis of this, food types are recognized. The device has already been tested on 13 to 49 year-old test subjects. During the study, the subjects ate six types of food and drank beverages. Results, published in IEEE Sensors Journal, show AutoDietary was able to identify sounds 85 percent of the time. Researchers said the device would help people suffering from certain diseases. Those with diabetes, bowel disorders and stomach problems can monitor food intake through this novel necklace. The wearable necklace works by matching the sounds against a catalog. Keeping an eye on what you eat was never easier. Doing away with the food journal and the weighing scale, this necklace lets you monitor what you eat. UB’s Assistant Professor of Computer Science at the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Wenyao Xu has also come up with the world’s “first sound library.” This library helps to find out what the wearer is chewing or gulping. However, AutoDietary has limits too. It cannot distinguish between similar foods. So, if you are swallowing soup or chili, this necklace would be hard pressed to know the difference. In addition, it can’t make out the ingredients of complex food items either. But Xu is working on a biomonitoring device to help AutoDietary. This device will check food value through measurements like blood sugar levels. Suggestions for healthier eating will also be provided through this system. The researchers are hoping to refine the necklace and make it more accurate. They aim to allow users to see how much sugar, fat etc has been taken in. It would also assess how food is metabolized by the body. According to Gizmodo, the team will continue to grow the library. From regular calorie counters and weight watches to diabetics, the necklace has value for many. This food feedback system may have a long way to go, but it has made a good start. Photo Sources: CarriageHouse2011/Flickr, Lisa/Flickr

The Sound Of Calories: Food Tracking Necklace “Listens” To What You Eat

When each food item is chewed, it has its own voice? That is the basic premise of the high tech, food tracking necklace by researchers from the University of Buffalo. UB scientists along with North Eastern University, China are revolutionizing nutrition mapping. Now, even the way you chew could be a clue to your caloric intake with the development of a new wearable technology called AutoDietary. Unique sounds are made when we bite, swallow and grind food. This is how AutoDietary, a food tracking necklace works. It monitors calorific intake rather than calories burned. McDonald’s Salad has More Calories Than A Big Mac!  Like us on Facebook AutoDietary can be worn around the neck and it has a mic which records sounds made when chewing. As food is swallowed, data are sent to a smartphone via Bluetooth. On the basis of this, food types are recognized. The device has already been tested on 13 to 49 year-old test subjects. During the study, the subjects ate six types of food and drank beverages. Results, published in IEEE Sensors Journal, show AutoDietary was able to identify sounds 85 percent of the time. Researchers said the device would help people suffering from certain diseases. Those with diabetes, bowel disorders and stomach problems can monitor food intake through this novel necklace. The wearable necklace works by matching the sounds against a catalog. Keeping an eye on what you eat was never easier. Doing away with the food journal and the weighing scale, this necklace lets you monitor what you eat. UB’s Assistant Professor of Computer Science at the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Wenyao Xu has also come up with the world’s “first sound library.” This library helps to find out what the wearer is chewing or gulping. However, AutoDietary has limits too. It cannot distinguish between similar foods. So, if you are swallowing soup or chili, this necklace would be hard pressed to know the difference. In addition, it can’t make out the ingredients of complex food items either. But Xu is working on a biomonitoring device to help AutoDietary. This device will check food value through measurements like blood sugar levels. Suggestions for healthier eating will also be provided through this system. The researchers are hoping to refine the necklace and make it more accurate. They aim to allow users to see how much sugar, fat etc has been taken in. It would also assess how food is metabolized by the body. According to Gizmodo, the team will continue to grow the library. From regular calorie counters and weight watches to diabetics, the necklace has value for many. This food feedback system may have a long way to go, but it has made a good start. Photo Sources: CarriageHouse2011/Flickr, Lisa/Flickr

The Sound Of Calories: Food Tracking Necklace “Listens” To What You Eat

When each food item is chewed, it has its own voice? That is the basic premise of the high tech, food tracking necklace by researchers from the University of Buffalo. UB scientists along with North Eastern University, China are revolutionizing nutrition mapping. Now, even the way you chew could be a clue to your caloric intake with the development of a new wearable technology called AutoDietary. Unique sounds are made when we bite, swallow and grind food. This is how AutoDietary, a food tracking necklace works. It monitors calorific intake rather than calories burned. McDonald’s Salad has More Calories Than A Big Mac!  Like us on Facebook AutoDietary can be worn around the neck and it has a mic which records sounds made when chewing. As food is swallowed, data are sent to a smartphone via Bluetooth. On the basis of this, food types are recognized. The device has already been tested on 13 to 49 year-old test subjects. During the study, the subjects ate six types of food and drank beverages. Results, published in IEEE Sensors Journal, show AutoDietary was able to identify sounds 85 percent of the time. Researchers said the device would help people suffering from certain diseases. Those with diabetes, bowel disorders and stomach problems can monitor food intake through this novel necklace. The wearable necklace works by matching the sounds against a catalog. Keeping an eye on what you eat was never easier. Doing away with the food journal and the weighing scale, this necklace lets you monitor what you eat. UB’s Assistant Professor of Computer Science at the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Wenyao Xu has also come up with the world’s “first sound library.” This library helps to find out what the wearer is chewing or gulping. However, AutoDietary has limits too. It cannot distinguish between similar foods. So, if you are swallowing soup or chili, this necklace would be hard pressed to know the difference. In addition, it can’t make out the ingredients of complex food items either. But Xu is working on a biomonitoring device to help AutoDietary. This device will check food value through measurements like blood sugar levels. Suggestions for healthier eating will also be provided through this system. The researchers are hoping to refine the necklace and make it more accurate. They aim to allow users to see how much sugar, fat etc has been taken in. It would also assess how food is metabolized by the body. According to Gizmodo, the team will continue to grow the library. From regular calorie counters and weight watches to diabetics, the necklace has value for many. This food feedback system may have a long way to go, but it has made a good start. Photo Sources: CarriageHouse2011/Flickr, Lisa/Flickr

The Sound Of Calories: Food Tracking Necklace “Listens” To What You Eat

When each food item is chewed, it has its own voice? That is the basic premise of the high tech, food tracking necklace by researchers from the University of Buffalo. UB scientists along with North Eastern University, China are revolutionizing nutrition mapping. Now, even the way you chew could be a clue to your caloric intake with the development of a new wearable technology called AutoDietary. Unique sounds are made when we bite, swallow and grind food. This is how AutoDietary, a food tracking necklace works. It monitors calorific intake rather than calories burned. McDonald’s Salad has More Calories Than A Big Mac!  Like us on Facebook AutoDietary can be worn around the neck and it has a mic which records sounds made when chewing. As food is swallowed, data are sent to a smartphone via Bluetooth. On the basis of this, food types are recognized. The device has already been tested on 13 to 49 year-old test subjects. During the study, the subjects ate six types of food and drank beverages. Results, published in IEEE Sensors Journal, show AutoDietary was able to identify sounds 85 percent of the time. Researchers said the device would help people suffering from certain diseases. Those with diabetes, bowel disorders and stomach problems can monitor food intake through this novel necklace. The wearable necklace works by matching the sounds against a catalog. Keeping an eye on what you eat was never easier. Doing away with the food journal and the weighing scale, this necklace lets you monitor what you eat. UB’s Assistant Professor of Computer Science at the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Wenyao Xu has also come up with the world’s “first sound library.” This library helps to find out what the wearer is chewing or gulping. However, AutoDietary has limits too. It cannot distinguish between similar foods. So, if you are swallowing soup or chili, this necklace would be hard pressed to know the difference. In addition, it can’t make out the ingredients of complex food items either. But Xu is working on a biomonitoring device to help AutoDietary. This device will check food value through measurements like blood sugar levels. Suggestions for healthier eating will also be provided through this system. The researchers are hoping to refine the necklace and make it more accurate. They aim to allow users to see how much sugar, fat etc has been taken in. It would also assess how food is metabolized by the body. According to Gizmodo, the team will continue to grow the library. From regular calorie counters and weight watches to diabetics, the necklace has value for many. This food feedback system may have a long way to go, but it has made a good start. Photo Sources: CarriageHouse2011/Flickr, Lisa/Flickr

The Sound Of Calories: Food Tracking Necklace “Listens” To What You Eat

When each food item is chewed, it has its own voice? That is the basic premise of the high tech, food tracking necklace by researchers from the University of Buffalo. UB scientists along with North Eastern University, China are revolutionizing nutrition mapping. Now, even the way you chew could be a clue to your caloric intake with the development of a new wearable technology called AutoDietary. Unique sounds are made when we bite, swallow and grind food. This is how AutoDietary, a food tracking necklace works. It monitors calorific intake rather than calories burned. McDonald’s Salad has More Calories Than A Big Mac!  Like us on Facebook AutoDietary can be worn around the neck and it has a mic which records sounds made when chewing. As food is swallowed, data are sent to a smartphone via Bluetooth. On the basis of this, food types are recognized. The device has already been tested on 13 to 49 year-old test subjects. During the study, the subjects ate six types of food and drank beverages. Results, published in IEEE Sensors Journal, show AutoDietary was able to identify sounds 85 percent of the time. Researchers said the device would help people suffering from certain diseases. Those with diabetes, bowel disorders and stomach problems can monitor food intake through this novel necklace. The wearable necklace works by matching the sounds against a catalog. Keeping an eye on what you eat was never easier. Doing away with the food journal and the weighing scale, this necklace lets you monitor what you eat. UB’s Assistant Professor of Computer Science at the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Wenyao Xu has also come up with the world’s “first sound library.” This library helps to find out what the wearer is chewing or gulping. However, AutoDietary has limits too. It cannot distinguish between similar foods. So, if you are swallowing soup or chili, this necklace would be hard pressed to know the difference. In addition, it can’t make out the ingredients of complex food items either. But Xu is working on a biomonitoring device to help AutoDietary. This device will check food value through measurements like blood sugar levels. Suggestions for healthier eating will also be provided through this system. The researchers are hoping to refine the necklace and make it more accurate. They aim to allow users to see how much sugar, fat etc has been taken in. It would also assess how food is metabolized by the body. According to Gizmodo, the team will continue to grow the library. From regular calorie counters and weight watches to diabetics, the necklace has value for many. This food feedback system may have a long way to go, but it has made a good start. Photo Sources: CarriageHouse2011/Flickr, Lisa/Flickr

The Sound Of Calories: Food Tracking Necklace “Listens” To What You Eat

When each food item is chewed, it has its own voice? That is the basic premise of the high tech, food tracking necklace by researchers from the University of Buffalo. UB scientists along with North Eastern University, China are revolutionizing nutrition mapping. Now, even the way you chew could be a clue to your caloric intake with the development of a new wearable technology called AutoDietary. Unique sounds are made when we bite, swallow and grind food. This is how AutoDietary, a food tracking necklace works. It monitors calorific intake rather than calories burned. McDonald’s Salad has More Calories Than A Big Mac!  Like us on Facebook AutoDietary can be worn around the neck and it has a mic which records sounds made when chewing. As food is swallowed, data are sent to a smartphone via Bluetooth. On the basis of this, food types are recognized. The device has already been tested on 13 to 49 year-old test subjects. During the study, the subjects ate six types of food and drank beverages. Results, published in IEEE Sensors Journal, show AutoDietary was able to identify sounds 85 percent of the time. Researchers said the device would help people suffering from certain diseases. Those with diabetes, bowel disorders and stomach problems can monitor food intake through this novel necklace. The wearable necklace works by matching the sounds against a catalog. Keeping an eye on what you eat was never easier. Doing away with the food journal and the weighing scale, this necklace lets you monitor what you eat. UB’s Assistant Professor of Computer Science at the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Wenyao Xu has also come up with the world’s “first sound library.” This library helps to find out what the wearer is chewing or gulping. However, AutoDietary has limits too. It cannot distinguish between similar foods. So, if you are swallowing soup or chili, this necklace would be hard pressed to know the difference. In addition, it can’t make out the ingredients of complex food items either. But Xu is working on a biomonitoring device to help AutoDietary. This device will check food value through measurements like blood sugar levels. Suggestions for healthier eating will also be provided through this system. The researchers are hoping to refine the necklace and make it more accurate. They aim to allow users to see how much sugar, fat etc has been taken in. It would also assess how food is metabolized by the body. According to Gizmodo, the team will continue to grow the library. From regular calorie counters and weight watches to diabetics, the necklace has value for many. This food feedback system may have a long way to go, but it has made a good start. Photo Sources: CarriageHouse2011/Flickr, Lisa/Flickr

The Sound Of Calories: Food Tracking Necklace “Listens” To What You Eat

When each food item is chewed, it has its own voice? That is the basic premise of the high tech, food tracking necklace by researchers from the University of Buffalo. UB scientists along with North Eastern University, China are revolutionizing nutrition mapping. Now, even the way you chew could be a clue to your caloric intake with the development of a new wearable technology called AutoDietary. Unique sounds are made when we bite, swallow and grind food. This is how AutoDietary, a food tracking necklace works. It monitors calorific intake rather than calories burned. McDonald’s Salad has More Calories Than A Big Mac!  Like us on Facebook AutoDietary can be worn around the neck and it has a mic which records sounds made when chewing. As food is swallowed, data are sent to a smartphone via Bluetooth. On the basis of this, food types are recognized. The device has already been tested on 13 to 49 year-old test subjects. During the study, the subjects ate six types of food and drank beverages. Results, published in IEEE Sensors Journal, show AutoDietary was able to identify sounds 85 percent of the time. Researchers said the device would help people suffering from certain diseases. Those with diabetes, bowel disorders and stomach problems can monitor food intake through this novel necklace. The wearable necklace works by matching the sounds against a catalog. Keeping an eye on what you eat was never easier. Doing away with the food journal and the weighing scale, this necklace lets you monitor what you eat. UB’s Assistant Professor of Computer Science at the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Wenyao Xu has also come up with the world’s “first sound library.” This library helps to find out what the wearer is chewing or gulping. However, AutoDietary has limits too. It cannot distinguish between similar foods. So, if you are swallowing soup or chili, this necklace would be hard pressed to know the difference. In addition, it can’t make out the ingredients of complex food items either. But Xu is working on a biomonitoring device to help AutoDietary. This device will check food value through measurements like blood sugar levels. Suggestions for healthier eating will also be provided through this system. The researchers are hoping to refine the necklace and make it more accurate. They aim to allow users to see how much sugar, fat etc has been taken in. It would also assess how food is metabolized by the body. According to Gizmodo, the team will continue to grow the library. From regular calorie counters and weight watches to diabetics, the necklace has value for many. This food feedback system may have a long way to go, but it has made a good start. Photo Sources: CarriageHouse2011/Flickr, Lisa/Flickr

The Sound Of Calories: Food Tracking Necklace “Listens” To What You Eat

When each food item is chewed, it has its own voice? That is the basic premise of the high tech, food tracking necklace by researchers from the University of Buffalo. UB scientists along with North Eastern University, China are revolutionizing nutrition mapping. Now, even the way you chew could be a clue to your caloric intake with the development of a new wearable technology called AutoDietary. Unique sounds are made when we bite, swallow and grind food. This is how AutoDietary, a food tracking necklace works. It monitors calorific intake rather than calories burned. McDonald’s Salad has More Calories Than A Big Mac!  Like us on Facebook AutoDietary can be worn around the neck and it has a mic which records sounds made when chewing. As food is swallowed, data are sent to a smartphone via Bluetooth. On the basis of this, food types are recognized. The device has already been tested on 13 to 49 year-old test subjects. During the study, the subjects ate six types of food and drank beverages. Results, published in IEEE Sensors Journal, show AutoDietary was able to identify sounds 85 percent of the time. Researchers said the device would help people suffering from certain diseases. Those with diabetes, bowel disorders and stomach problems can monitor food intake through this novel necklace. The wearable necklace works by matching the sounds against a catalog. Keeping an eye on what you eat was never easier. Doing away with the food journal and the weighing scale, this necklace lets you monitor what you eat. UB’s Assistant Professor of Computer Science at the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Wenyao Xu has also come up with the world’s “first sound library.” This library helps to find out what the wearer is chewing or gulping. However, AutoDietary has limits too. It cannot distinguish between similar foods. So, if you are swallowing soup or chili, this necklace would be hard pressed to know the difference. In addition, it can’t make out the ingredients of complex food items either. But Xu is working on a biomonitoring device to help AutoDietary. This device will check food value through measurements like blood sugar levels. Suggestions for healthier eating will also be provided through this system. The researchers are hoping to refine the necklace and make it more accurate. They aim to allow users to see how much sugar, fat etc has been taken in. It would also assess how food is metabolized by the body. According to Gizmodo, the team will continue to grow the library. From regular calorie counters and weight watches to diabetics, the necklace has value for many. This food feedback system may have a long way to go, but it has made a good start. Photo Sources: CarriageHouse2011/Flickr, Lisa/Flickr

The Sound Of Calories: Food Tracking Necklace “Listens” To What You Eat

When each food item is chewed, it has its own voice? That is the basic premise of the high tech, food tracking necklace by researchers from the University of Buffalo. UB scientists along with North Eastern University, China are revolutionizing nutrition mapping. Now, even the way you chew could be a clue to your caloric intake with the development of a new wearable technology called AutoDietary. Unique sounds are made when we bite, swallow and grind food. This is how AutoDietary, a food tracking necklace works. It monitors calorific intake rather than calories burned. McDonald’s Salad has More Calories Than A Big Mac!  Like us on Facebook AutoDietary can be worn around the neck and it has a mic which records sounds made when chewing. As food is swallowed, data are sent to a smartphone via Bluetooth. On the basis of this, food types are recognized. The device has already been tested on 13 to 49 year-old test subjects. During the study, the subjects ate six types of food and drank beverages. Results, published in IEEE Sensors Journal, show AutoDietary was able to identify sounds 85 percent of the time. Researchers said the device would help people suffering from certain diseases. Those with diabetes, bowel disorders and stomach problems can monitor food intake through this novel necklace. The wearable necklace works by matching the sounds against a catalog. Keeping an eye on what you eat was never easier. Doing away with the food journal and the weighing scale, this necklace lets you monitor what you eat. UB’s Assistant Professor of Computer Science at the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Wenyao Xu has also come up with the world’s “first sound library.” This library helps to find out what the wearer is chewing or gulping. However, AutoDietary has limits too. It cannot distinguish between similar foods. So, if you are swallowing soup or chili, this necklace would be hard pressed to know the difference. In addition, it can’t make out the ingredients of complex food items either. But Xu is working on a biomonitoring device to help AutoDietary. This device will check food value through measurements like blood sugar levels. Suggestions for healthier eating will also be provided through this system. The researchers are hoping to refine the necklace and make it more accurate. They aim to allow users to see how much sugar, fat etc has been taken in. It would also assess how food is metabolized by the body. According to Gizmodo, the team will continue to grow the library. From regular calorie counters and weight watches to diabetics, the necklace has value for many. This food feedback system may have a long way to go, but it has made a good start. Photo Sources: CarriageHouse2011/Flickr, Lisa/Flickr