Asthma: The Killer Of Older Women

Latest figures on asthma risks show that older women are twice more likely to die of the condition than men.  What seems to be a common childhood disease can be deadly if not being treated carefully and addressed immediately.  Treatment for asthma is based on drugs and also developing an asthma action plan for severe episodes. Asthma educator and sufferer Leesa Baker, from Carcoar, was alarmed to find out that the latest figures from the Australian Bureau of Statistics emphasized that woman over 55 are mostly at risk of dying asthma. “It was alarming, I thought ‘geez I’m nearly there’ and it made me think that’s a bit of a worry,” she said. As reported in Central Western Daily, Mrs Baker compassionately shares her ideas trying to educate people on asthma, being a sufferer herself.  She also mentioned that it is important to know what triggers the attacks and be prepared about it.Like us on Facebook Pal-Kristian HamreDecreased Asthma Risk In Children Raised With Dogs Women suffering from asthma attacks are encouraged to take precautionary measures and strictly follow their asthma action plans after figures were out from The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) and the National Asthma Council Australia.  Both reports confirmed that women with ages 55 to 74 were mostly to die from asthma as compared to men who also suffers the same condition. In 2014, it recorded 419 asthma-related deaths, 277 of which were women and 142 were men. But how does someone die from asthma? A person suffering from asthma attack has difficulty of breathing, wheezing, coughing, and shortness of breath and has difficulty performing normal daily activities. “The ultimate cause of death is a shortage of oxygen,’ says Dr Martyn Partridge, Chief Medical Adviser to the National Asthma Campaign, in a report by The Daily Mail. As the adage goes, “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.”  For the National Asthma Council’s chair Doctor Dr Jonathan Burdon, “asthma deaths are largely preventable.” “Asthma can’t be cured but it can be controlled with asthma preventer and reliever medication, and by following an up-to-date asthma action plan prepared with your doctor,” said Dr Burdon. Photo: Pal-Kristian Hamre, Intel Free Press

Asthma: The Killer Of Older Women

Latest figures on asthma risks show that older women are twice more likely to die of the condition than men.  What seems to be a common childhood disease can be deadly if not being treated carefully and addressed immediately.  Treatment for asthma is based on drugs and also developing an asthma action plan for severe episodes. Asthma educator and sufferer Leesa Baker, from Carcoar, was alarmed to find out that the latest figures from the Australian Bureau of Statistics emphasized that woman over 55 are mostly at risk of dying asthma. “It was alarming, I thought ‘geez I’m nearly there’ and it made me think that’s a bit of a worry,” she said. As reported in Central Western Daily, Mrs Baker compassionately shares her ideas trying to educate people on asthma, being a sufferer herself.  She also mentioned that it is important to know what triggers the attacks and be prepared about it.Like us on Facebook Pal-Kristian HamreDecreased Asthma Risk In Children Raised With Dogs Women suffering from asthma attacks are encouraged to take precautionary measures and strictly follow their asthma action plans after figures were out from The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) and the National Asthma Council Australia.  Both reports confirmed that women with ages 55 to 74 were mostly to die from asthma as compared to men who also suffers the same condition. In 2014, it recorded 419 asthma-related deaths, 277 of which were women and 142 were men. But how does someone die from asthma? A person suffering from asthma attack has difficulty of breathing, wheezing, coughing, and shortness of breath and has difficulty performing normal daily activities. “The ultimate cause of death is a shortage of oxygen,’ says Dr Martyn Partridge, Chief Medical Adviser to the National Asthma Campaign, in a report by The Daily Mail. As the adage goes, “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.”  For the National Asthma Council’s chair Doctor Dr Jonathan Burdon, “asthma deaths are largely preventable.” “Asthma can’t be cured but it can be controlled with asthma preventer and reliever medication, and by following an up-to-date asthma action plan prepared with your doctor,” said Dr Burdon. Photo: Pal-Kristian Hamre, Intel Free Press

Asthma: The Killer Of Older Women

Latest figures on asthma risks show that older women are twice more likely to die of the condition than men.  What seems to be a common childhood disease can be deadly if not being treated carefully and addressed immediately.  Treatment for asthma is based on drugs and also developing an asthma action plan for severe episodes. Asthma educator and sufferer Leesa Baker, from Carcoar, was alarmed to find out that the latest figures from the Australian Bureau of Statistics emphasized that woman over 55 are mostly at risk of dying asthma. “It was alarming, I thought ‘geez I’m nearly there’ and it made me think that’s a bit of a worry,” she said. As reported in Central Western Daily, Mrs Baker compassionately shares her ideas trying to educate people on asthma, being a sufferer herself.  She also mentioned that it is important to know what triggers the attacks and be prepared about it.Like us on Facebook Pal-Kristian HamreDecreased Asthma Risk In Children Raised With Dogs Women suffering from asthma attacks are encouraged to take precautionary measures and strictly follow their asthma action plans after figures were out from The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) and the National Asthma Council Australia.  Both reports confirmed that women with ages 55 to 74 were mostly to die from asthma as compared to men who also suffers the same condition. In 2014, it recorded 419 asthma-related deaths, 277 of which were women and 142 were men. But how does someone die from asthma? A person suffering from asthma attack has difficulty of breathing, wheezing, coughing, and shortness of breath and has difficulty performing normal daily activities. “The ultimate cause of death is a shortage of oxygen,’ says Dr Martyn Partridge, Chief Medical Adviser to the National Asthma Campaign, in a report by The Daily Mail. As the adage goes, “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.”  For the National Asthma Council’s chair Doctor Dr Jonathan Burdon, “asthma deaths are largely preventable.” “Asthma can’t be cured but it can be controlled with asthma preventer and reliever medication, and by following an up-to-date asthma action plan prepared with your doctor,” said Dr Burdon. Photo: Pal-Kristian Hamre, Intel Free Press

Asthma: The Killer Of Older Women

Latest figures on asthma risks show that older women are twice more likely to die of the condition than men.  What seems to be a common childhood disease can be deadly if not being treated carefully and addressed immediately.  Treatment for asthma is based on drugs and also developing an asthma action plan for severe episodes. Asthma educator and sufferer Leesa Baker, from Carcoar, was alarmed to find out that the latest figures from the Australian Bureau of Statistics emphasized that woman over 55 are mostly at risk of dying asthma. “It was alarming, I thought ‘geez I’m nearly there’ and it made me think that’s a bit of a worry,” she said. As reported in Central Western Daily, Mrs Baker compassionately shares her ideas trying to educate people on asthma, being a sufferer herself.  She also mentioned that it is important to know what triggers the attacks and be prepared about it.Like us on Facebook Pal-Kristian HamreDecreased Asthma Risk In Children Raised With Dogs Women suffering from asthma attacks are encouraged to take precautionary measures and strictly follow their asthma action plans after figures were out from The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) and the National Asthma Council Australia.  Both reports confirmed that women with ages 55 to 74 were mostly to die from asthma as compared to men who also suffers the same condition. In 2014, it recorded 419 asthma-related deaths, 277 of which were women and 142 were men. But how does someone die from asthma? A person suffering from asthma attack has difficulty of breathing, wheezing, coughing, and shortness of breath and has difficulty performing normal daily activities. “The ultimate cause of death is a shortage of oxygen,’ says Dr Martyn Partridge, Chief Medical Adviser to the National Asthma Campaign, in a report by The Daily Mail. As the adage goes, “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.”  For the National Asthma Council’s chair Doctor Dr Jonathan Burdon, “asthma deaths are largely preventable.” “Asthma can’t be cured but it can be controlled with asthma preventer and reliever medication, and by following an up-to-date asthma action plan prepared with your doctor,” said Dr Burdon. Photo: Pal-Kristian Hamre, Intel Free Press

Asthma: The Killer Of Older Women

Latest figures on asthma risks show that older women are twice more likely to die of the condition than men.  What seems to be a common childhood disease can be deadly if not being treated carefully and addressed immediately.  Treatment for asthma is based on drugs and also developing an asthma action plan for severe episodes. Asthma educator and sufferer Leesa Baker, from Carcoar, was alarmed to find out that the latest figures from the Australian Bureau of Statistics emphasized that woman over 55 are mostly at risk of dying asthma. “It was alarming, I thought ‘geez I’m nearly there’ and it made me think that’s a bit of a worry,” she said. As reported in Central Western Daily, Mrs Baker compassionately shares her ideas trying to educate people on asthma, being a sufferer herself.  She also mentioned that it is important to know what triggers the attacks and be prepared about it.Like us on Facebook Pal-Kristian HamreDecreased Asthma Risk In Children Raised With Dogs Women suffering from asthma attacks are encouraged to take precautionary measures and strictly follow their asthma action plans after figures were out from The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) and the National Asthma Council Australia.  Both reports confirmed that women with ages 55 to 74 were mostly to die from asthma as compared to men who also suffers the same condition. In 2014, it recorded 419 asthma-related deaths, 277 of which were women and 142 were men. But how does someone die from asthma? A person suffering from asthma attack has difficulty of breathing, wheezing, coughing, and shortness of breath and has difficulty performing normal daily activities. “The ultimate cause of death is a shortage of oxygen,’ says Dr Martyn Partridge, Chief Medical Adviser to the National Asthma Campaign, in a report by The Daily Mail. As the adage goes, “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.”  For the National Asthma Council’s chair Doctor Dr Jonathan Burdon, “asthma deaths are largely preventable.” “Asthma can’t be cured but it can be controlled with asthma preventer and reliever medication, and by following an up-to-date asthma action plan prepared with your doctor,” said Dr Burdon. Photo: Pal-Kristian Hamre, Intel Free Press

Asthma: The Killer Of Older Women

Latest figures on asthma risks show that older women are twice more likely to die of the condition than men.  What seems to be a common childhood disease can be deadly if not being treated carefully and addressed immediately.  Treatment for asthma is based on drugs and also developing an asthma action plan for severe episodes. Asthma educator and sufferer Leesa Baker, from Carcoar, was alarmed to find out that the latest figures from the Australian Bureau of Statistics emphasized that woman over 55 are mostly at risk of dying asthma. “It was alarming, I thought ‘geez I’m nearly there’ and it made me think that’s a bit of a worry,” she said. As reported in Central Western Daily, Mrs Baker compassionately shares her ideas trying to educate people on asthma, being a sufferer herself.  She also mentioned that it is important to know what triggers the attacks and be prepared about it.Like us on Facebook Pal-Kristian HamreDecreased Asthma Risk In Children Raised With Dogs Women suffering from asthma attacks are encouraged to take precautionary measures and strictly follow their asthma action plans after figures were out from The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) and the National Asthma Council Australia.  Both reports confirmed that women with ages 55 to 74 were mostly to die from asthma as compared to men who also suffers the same condition. In 2014, it recorded 419 asthma-related deaths, 277 of which were women and 142 were men. But how does someone die from asthma? A person suffering from asthma attack has difficulty of breathing, wheezing, coughing, and shortness of breath and has difficulty performing normal daily activities. “The ultimate cause of death is a shortage of oxygen,’ says Dr Martyn Partridge, Chief Medical Adviser to the National Asthma Campaign, in a report by The Daily Mail. As the adage goes, “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.”  For the National Asthma Council’s chair Doctor Dr Jonathan Burdon, “asthma deaths are largely preventable.” “Asthma can’t be cured but it can be controlled with asthma preventer and reliever medication, and by following an up-to-date asthma action plan prepared with your doctor,” said Dr Burdon. Photo: Pal-Kristian Hamre, Intel Free Press

Asthma: The Killer Of Older Women

Latest figures on asthma risks show that older women are twice more likely to die of the condition than men.  What seems to be a common childhood disease can be deadly if not being treated carefully and addressed immediately.  Treatment for asthma is based on drugs and also developing an asthma action plan for severe episodes. Asthma educator and sufferer Leesa Baker, from Carcoar, was alarmed to find out that the latest figures from the Australian Bureau of Statistics emphasized that woman over 55 are mostly at risk of dying asthma. “It was alarming, I thought ‘geez I’m nearly there’ and it made me think that’s a bit of a worry,” she said. As reported in Central Western Daily, Mrs Baker compassionately shares her ideas trying to educate people on asthma, being a sufferer herself.  She also mentioned that it is important to know what triggers the attacks and be prepared about it.Like us on Facebook Pal-Kristian HamreDecreased Asthma Risk In Children Raised With Dogs Women suffering from asthma attacks are encouraged to take precautionary measures and strictly follow their asthma action plans after figures were out from The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) and the National Asthma Council Australia.  Both reports confirmed that women with ages 55 to 74 were mostly to die from asthma as compared to men who also suffers the same condition. In 2014, it recorded 419 asthma-related deaths, 277 of which were women and 142 were men. But how does someone die from asthma? A person suffering from asthma attack has difficulty of breathing, wheezing, coughing, and shortness of breath and has difficulty performing normal daily activities. “The ultimate cause of death is a shortage of oxygen,’ says Dr Martyn Partridge, Chief Medical Adviser to the National Asthma Campaign, in a report by The Daily Mail. As the adage goes, “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.”  For the National Asthma Council’s chair Doctor Dr Jonathan Burdon, “asthma deaths are largely preventable.” “Asthma can’t be cured but it can be controlled with asthma preventer and reliever medication, and by following an up-to-date asthma action plan prepared with your doctor,” said Dr Burdon. Photo: Pal-Kristian Hamre, Intel Free Press

Asthma: The Killer Of Older Women

Latest figures on asthma risks show that older women are twice more likely to die of the condition than men.  What seems to be a common childhood disease can be deadly if not being treated carefully and addressed immediately.  Treatment for asthma is based on drugs and also developing an asthma action plan for severe episodes. Asthma educator and sufferer Leesa Baker, from Carcoar, was alarmed to find out that the latest figures from the Australian Bureau of Statistics emphasized that woman over 55 are mostly at risk of dying asthma. “It was alarming, I thought ‘geez I’m nearly there’ and it made me think that’s a bit of a worry,” she said. As reported in Central Western Daily, Mrs Baker compassionately shares her ideas trying to educate people on asthma, being a sufferer herself.  She also mentioned that it is important to know what triggers the attacks and be prepared about it.Like us on Facebook Pal-Kristian HamreDecreased Asthma Risk In Children Raised With Dogs Women suffering from asthma attacks are encouraged to take precautionary measures and strictly follow their asthma action plans after figures were out from The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) and the National Asthma Council Australia.  Both reports confirmed that women with ages 55 to 74 were mostly to die from asthma as compared to men who also suffers the same condition. In 2014, it recorded 419 asthma-related deaths, 277 of which were women and 142 were men. But how does someone die from asthma? A person suffering from asthma attack has difficulty of breathing, wheezing, coughing, and shortness of breath and has difficulty performing normal daily activities. “The ultimate cause of death is a shortage of oxygen,’ says Dr Martyn Partridge, Chief Medical Adviser to the National Asthma Campaign, in a report by The Daily Mail. As the adage goes, “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.”  For the National Asthma Council’s chair Doctor Dr Jonathan Burdon, “asthma deaths are largely preventable.” “Asthma can’t be cured but it can be controlled with asthma preventer and reliever medication, and by following an up-to-date asthma action plan prepared with your doctor,” said Dr Burdon. Photo: Pal-Kristian Hamre, Intel Free Press

Asthma: The Killer Of Older Women

Latest figures on asthma risks show that older women are twice more likely to die of the condition than men.  What seems to be a common childhood disease can be deadly if not being treated carefully and addressed immediately.  Treatment for asthma is based on drugs and also developing an asthma action plan for severe episodes. Asthma educator and sufferer Leesa Baker, from Carcoar, was alarmed to find out that the latest figures from the Australian Bureau of Statistics emphasized that woman over 55 are mostly at risk of dying asthma. “It was alarming, I thought ‘geez I’m nearly there’ and it made me think that’s a bit of a worry,” she said. As reported in Central Western Daily, Mrs Baker compassionately shares her ideas trying to educate people on asthma, being a sufferer herself.  She also mentioned that it is important to know what triggers the attacks and be prepared about it.Like us on Facebook Pal-Kristian HamreDecreased Asthma Risk In Children Raised With Dogs Women suffering from asthma attacks are encouraged to take precautionary measures and strictly follow their asthma action plans after figures were out from The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) and the National Asthma Council Australia.  Both reports confirmed that women with ages 55 to 74 were mostly to die from asthma as compared to men who also suffers the same condition. In 2014, it recorded 419 asthma-related deaths, 277 of which were women and 142 were men. But how does someone die from asthma? A person suffering from asthma attack has difficulty of breathing, wheezing, coughing, and shortness of breath and has difficulty performing normal daily activities. “The ultimate cause of death is a shortage of oxygen,’ says Dr Martyn Partridge, Chief Medical Adviser to the National Asthma Campaign, in a report by The Daily Mail. As the adage goes, “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.”  For the National Asthma Council’s chair Doctor Dr Jonathan Burdon, “asthma deaths are largely preventable.” “Asthma can’t be cured but it can be controlled with asthma preventer and reliever medication, and by following an up-to-date asthma action plan prepared with your doctor,” said Dr Burdon. Photo: Pal-Kristian Hamre, Intel Free Press

Asthma: The Killer Of Older Women

Latest figures on asthma risks show that older women are twice more likely to die of the condition than men.  What seems to be a common childhood disease can be deadly if not being treated carefully and addressed immediately.  Treatment for asthma is based on drugs and also developing an asthma action plan for severe episodes. Asthma educator and sufferer Leesa Baker, from Carcoar, was alarmed to find out that the latest figures from the Australian Bureau of Statistics emphasized that woman over 55 are mostly at risk of dying asthma. “It was alarming, I thought ‘geez I’m nearly there’ and it made me think that’s a bit of a worry,” she said. As reported in Central Western Daily, Mrs Baker compassionately shares her ideas trying to educate people on asthma, being a sufferer herself.  She also mentioned that it is important to know what triggers the attacks and be prepared about it.Like us on Facebook Pal-Kristian HamreDecreased Asthma Risk In Children Raised With Dogs Women suffering from asthma attacks are encouraged to take precautionary measures and strictly follow their asthma action plans after figures were out from The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) and the National Asthma Council Australia.  Both reports confirmed that women with ages 55 to 74 were mostly to die from asthma as compared to men who also suffers the same condition. In 2014, it recorded 419 asthma-related deaths, 277 of which were women and 142 were men. But how does someone die from asthma? A person suffering from asthma attack has difficulty of breathing, wheezing, coughing, and shortness of breath and has difficulty performing normal daily activities. “The ultimate cause of death is a shortage of oxygen,’ says Dr Martyn Partridge, Chief Medical Adviser to the National Asthma Campaign, in a report by The Daily Mail. As the adage goes, “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.”  For the National Asthma Council’s chair Doctor Dr Jonathan Burdon, “asthma deaths are largely preventable.” “Asthma can’t be cured but it can be controlled with asthma preventer and reliever medication, and by following an up-to-date asthma action plan prepared with your doctor,” said Dr Burdon. Photo: Pal-Kristian Hamre, Intel Free Press