Study: Stress Is Making American Dogs Go Prematurely Gray

A surprising new study suggests that it’s not just Americans who are under extreme stress these days but our dogs, too — and the stress is making our canine companions go prematurely gray, according to CNN. The study, which was suggested and co-authored by famous animal behavior expert and autism advocate Temple Grandin and published in this month’s edition of the journal Applied Animal Behaviour Science, looked at 400 dogs who were under four years old to see if there was a correlation between their anxiety levels and going prematurely gray. People aren’t the only ones to gray due to stress; now…#dogs turn gray from anxiety, too: https://t.co/2GgOj4Sjor pic.twitter.com/o4N4ntHGwc — Pets for Patriots (@PetsforPatriots) December 20, 2016 “Normally, dogs wouldn’t be gray at age 4,” Grandin said. Animal behaviorist and fellow author Camille King, who owns the Canine Education Center in Denver says she noticed a few years ago that many impulsive and anxious dogs seemed to be turning prematurely gray. She says she told Grandin her observations and Grandin encouraged her to design a study to look into a possible correlation. “The first thing I thought of when she told me that were the presidents, and how they age and get prematurely gray,” said Grandin, who is currently a professor of animal science at Colorado State University. King and Grandin enlisted the aid of fellow animal behavioralists Peter Borchelt and Thomas Smith to visit dog parks, dog shows, veterinary clinics and other locations frequented by dog owners in order to study 400 dogs in Colorado and administer dog behavior questionnaires to their owners, according to Northern Illinois University Today. In the journal article, “Anxiety and impulsivity: Factors associated with premature graying in young dogs,” the researchers said that the dog owners were told that the purpose of the study involved dog lifestyle, in order to prevent response bias. They said that “distractor items” were also added to the survey to prevent the owner from guessing the purpose of the survey. Measures of anxiety in the dogs included answers such as destruction when dogs were left alone, loss of hair during vet exams or being in a new place, and cringing or cowering in response to groups of people. Examples of behaviors that indicated impulsive behaviors included jumping on people, not being able to get calm, loss of focus and hyperactivity after exercise. Even dogs can get gray hair from stress. Or from paint in trashcans. #DoggieDepression pic.twitter.com/xDLTOfiILd — Joe Paradis (@joe_paradis) August 9, 2013 The researchers had independent raters examine photos taken of the dogs at the sites and rate the extent of the dogs’ muzzle grayness. Only non-white dogs were used for the study, in order to show graying. The researchers found that dogs between one and four years of age whose owners reported higher signs of anxiety tended to show a greater extent of premature muzzle graying than the less anxious dogs. Dogs whose owners rated them as more impulsive also tended to have more prematurely gray muzzles. The study showed that dogs that had more anxious and impulsive behaviors did tend to show premature graying. In our sample of young dogs, latent variable regression showed that the extent of muzzle grayness was significantly and positively predicted by anxiety (p = 0.005) and impulsivity (p < 0.001). In addition, female dogs tended to have more premature gray hairs than male dogs. Dog size, whether the dogs were spayed or neutered, and the presence of medical problems did not significantly predict the extent of muzzle grayness, however. Smith, who provided methodological and statistical expertise, said that he was surprised by the results of the study. “At first, I was somewhat skeptical of the hypothesis,” he said. “However, when we analyzed the data, the results actually were quite striking.” Grandin said the results provide important information for dog owners. “This is an original, unique study that has implications for dog welfare,” she said. [Featured Image by Puzzle/Shutterstock]

'Eagle Cam' Live: Bald Eagles In Southwest Florida Wait For 2 Eaglets To Hatch, Watch The Livestream!

Have you ever seen a bald eagle give birth? Have you had a chance to witness an eaglet hatch? Chances are that a vast number of people cannot answer “yes” to either of those questions. Perhaps that is why a certain livestream on YouTube of bald eagles in Southwest Florida is getting a lot of attention. The livestream eagle footage, which is hosted by Dick Pritchett Real Estate, features bald eagles Harriet and MI5 taking turns sitting in a nest – patiently waiting for the arrival of their two young eaglets. 5 Facts You Didn’t Know about America’s Beloved Bald Eagle. https://t.co/qrm2DkceJU pic.twitter.com/uJGof7OFLs — James Lucas Ⓥ (@JamesELucas) December 28, 2016 According to the Dick Pratchett Real Estate website, there are three separate camera angles being used to film the eagles throughout the duration of the livestream. While the close-up footage may seem to place the cameras in close proximity of the actual nest, none of the cameras can be seen or heard by the eagles. “Eagles are wild birds and anything can happen in the wild. The Southwest Florida Eagle Camera (SWFEC) does not interfere or intervene and allows nature to take its course. You will see life and you might see death, but this is nature at her finest.” This is apparently not the first time that Harriet went viral with footage of this type of in-nest hatching experience. She reportedly went viral more than four years ago in October of 2012 when millions of people watched her raise two eaglets with her then-partner Ozzie. Ozzie and Harriet – a couple who was likely named after the popular 1950s ABC sitcom The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet – hatched another pair of eaglets. Unfortunately, one of those eaglets passed away at the age of 41-days old. Sadly, Ozzie and Harriet suffered a similar tragedy in 2014 when one of their two newest eaglets died nearly one month after first hatching. Photos of #SWFL bald eagles Ozzie and Harriet through the years. Gallery: https://t.co/DY3vWfcx5C pic.twitter.com/E54pH43HgZ — Naples Daily News (@ndn) October 1, 2016 After sustaining severe injuries during a flight, Ozzie passed away himself in 2015. However, Harriet “found love” again when she met M15 and the “lovebirds” welcomed their first pair of eaglets together this past January. Maintaining an average of two eaglets per clutch is accurate for bald eagles, according to the Hancock Wildlife Foundation. Each of the two eggs is laid nearly 3 days apart. In the case of M15 and Harriet, the two eggs featured in the current “eagle cam” livestream were laid right on schedule – November 22nd and 25th respectively. Once the eagles start sitting on the egg to raise its temperature, the incubation period (which typically lasts 35 days) begins. Since the incubation period lines up with the timeline in which the eggs were first laid, this means that the eaglets usually hatch 3 days apart as well. As seen with M15 and Harriet, both of the eagles share the responsibility of incubating their eggs. However, studies have shown that the mother eagle usually takes the longer overnight shifts and during inclement weather. The fish-eagle is probably the most familiar bird of prey in Africa females lay 1-3 eggs incubation approx 44 days pic.twitter.com/1MiTMZIyXg — africanwildlife (@awpfnow) June 14, 2016 Throughout the incubation period, the eggs are typically rolled over every 1-2 hours. This is done to make sure the lighter yolk never raises to the egg surface. If the eaglet’s fragile blood vessels make contact with and stick to the surface of the egg shell, this could potentially kill the baby eagle before he or she ever hatches. As of 12:55 PM (Eastern Time) on Wednesday, the “eagle cam” livestream has been viewed over 57.2 million times with more than 24,900 people actively watching it. Now it is just a matter of time before these amazing bald eagles, M15 and Harriet, become parents all over again. Thanks to YouTube, millions of people have a chance to experience a very rare eyewitness opportunity! (Featured Image by Tom Gannam/AP Photo)

Watch Eagle Cam Live Streaming Online, Eaglet Hatch Watch Is Happening Now, Check Out Photos Too [Video]

The countdown is underway as thousands of viewers watch the Southwest Florida eagle cam live stream that you may see in the video player above. Harriet and her mate, M15, have incubated two eggs for over a month and the eggs are ready to hatch. The eagle’s nest and web cams are located on property owned by Dick Pritchett. He first set up the web cam in October 2012 and has continued to be one of the leading sources for streaming, online viewing for live eagle cams. Dick Pritchett has a blog, official Facebook, Instagram and YouTube account that is devoted to viewing the eagles and updating their current status. The live streaming eagle cam is located in North Fort Myers, Florida. You can learn more about the Southwest Florida eagle cam’s history at Dick Pritchett’s official site. Check out photos of the eagles and the eggs from Pritchett’s Facebook page and Instagram below. You may see more pictures at the site here. Side by side comparisons of Harriet and M, taken this morning. (Photo by Sharon Dunne) #eaglecam #instaeagle #birdsofinstagram #birdpicoftheday #your_best_birds #nature_of_your_world #Allmightybirds #anythingfeathered #feather_features #birdextreme #fiftyshades_of_nature #ic_nature #allnatureshots #nature_sultans #nuts_about_birds #bns_birds #ig_great_shots_fla #animalelite #birdselite #bestnatureshot #igbirds #kings_birds @feather_perfection #loves_birds @Nature_brilliance #only_raptors #roamflorida #bestbirdshots #igscwildlife #nature2000 A photo posted by Southwest Florida Eagle Cam (@swfleaglecam) on Nov 1, 2016 at 9:05pm PDT Harriet (photo: Desiree Deliz) #swfleaglecam #eaglecam #instaeagle #birdsofinstagram #thetweetsuites #your_best_birds #nature_of_your_world #Allmightybirds #anythingfeathered #feather_features #birdextreme #fiftyshades_of_nature #ic_nature #allnatureshots #nature_sultans #nuts_about_birds #bns_birds #ig_great_shots_fla #animalelite #birdselite #bestnatureshot #igbirds #kings_birds @feather_perfection #loves_birds @Nature_brilliance #only_raptors #roamflorida #bestbirdshots #igscwildlife #nature2000 A photo posted by Southwest Florida Eagle Cam (@swfleaglecam) on Dec 18, 2016 at 7:14am PST As referenced by Dick Pritchett, the first season of eaglets hatched in 2012. This is the fifth season of the live streaming eagle cam, and other people are getting in on the action. There are several YouTube video users who watch the eagle cam and collect some of the memorable moments. YouTube user WskrsnWings has created a Season 5 video playlist. You may see those videos below. Another YouTube user following Season Five of the Southwest Florida eagle cam is Lady Hawk. She has collected a variety of videos from the streaming cam that highlight some of the best moments. The video coverage starts on Sept. 9 and is updated each day something significant happens. You may watch those videos below. Harriet first paired with an eagle named Ozzie who unfortunately passed away in 2015. After looking for suitors, Harriet paired with M15, and the couple raised their first brood in Jan. 2016. Now the pair is embarking on their journey again with two new eggs. The eggs for the fifth season were laid on Nov. 22, 2016, and Nov. 25, 2016. All eyes are on the cam as they are expected to hatch at any moment. It is against Florida law to disturb eagles or their nests. Due to that law, the live streaming eagle cam is a look at life in the wild. If an eagle is under attack, you will see the live stream from one of the three cams set up on the property. Dick Pritchett advises people to watch the eagle cam streaming live online from their homes, or through their mobile devices. It isn’t recommended to try and view the nests in person. The cams are situated in a premium location and will give the best view to viewers. The Southwest Florida eagle cam gives a look into the daily lives of eagles you otherwise would not see. Also, those who attempt to see the nests in person will be recorded, so it is best to appreciate the efforts Pritchett has invested in providing the live stream for millions of people to see, free of charge, 24/7. Stay tuned as we’ll bring you the latest news and updates as soon as the eagleets hatch. Are you going to watch the eagle cam live stream? [Featured Image by Rocky Grimes/Shutterstock]

Watch Eagle Cam Live Streaming Online, Eaglet Hatch Watch Is Happening Now, Check Out Photos Too [Video]

The countdown is underway as thousands of viewers watch the Southwest Florida eagle cam live stream that you may see in the video player above. Harriet and her mate, M15, have incubated two eggs for over a month and the eggs are ready to hatch. The eagle’s nest and web cams are located on property owned by Dick Pritchett. He first set up the web cam in October 2012 and has continued to be one of the leading sources for streaming, online viewing for live eagle cams. Dick Pritchett has a blog, official Facebook, Instagram and YouTube account that is devoted to viewing the eagles and updating their current status. The live streaming eagle cam is located in North Fort Myers, Florida. You can learn more about the Southwest Florida eagle cam’s history at Dick Pritchett’s official site. Check out photos of the eagles and the eggs from Pritchett’s Facebook page and Instagram below. You may see more pictures at the site here. Side by side comparisons of Harriet and M, taken this morning. (Photo by Sharon Dunne) #eaglecam #instaeagle #birdsofinstagram #birdpicoftheday #your_best_birds #nature_of_your_world #Allmightybirds #anythingfeathered #feather_features #birdextreme #fiftyshades_of_nature #ic_nature #allnatureshots #nature_sultans #nuts_about_birds #bns_birds #ig_great_shots_fla #animalelite #birdselite #bestnatureshot #igbirds #kings_birds @feather_perfection #loves_birds @Nature_brilliance #only_raptors #roamflorida #bestbirdshots #igscwildlife #nature2000 A photo posted by Southwest Florida Eagle Cam (@swfleaglecam) on Nov 1, 2016 at 9:05pm PDT Harriet (photo: Desiree Deliz) #swfleaglecam #eaglecam #instaeagle #birdsofinstagram #thetweetsuites #your_best_birds #nature_of_your_world #Allmightybirds #anythingfeathered #feather_features #birdextreme #fiftyshades_of_nature #ic_nature #allnatureshots #nature_sultans #nuts_about_birds #bns_birds #ig_great_shots_fla #animalelite #birdselite #bestnatureshot #igbirds #kings_birds @feather_perfection #loves_birds @Nature_brilliance #only_raptors #roamflorida #bestbirdshots #igscwildlife #nature2000 A photo posted by Southwest Florida Eagle Cam (@swfleaglecam) on Dec 18, 2016 at 7:14am PST As referenced by Dick Pritchett, the first season of eaglets hatched in 2012. This is the fifth season of the live streaming eagle cam, and other people are getting in on the action. There are several YouTube video users who watch the eagle cam and collect some of the memorable moments. YouTube user WskrsnWings has created a Season 5 video playlist. You may see those videos below. Another YouTube user following Season Five of the Southwest Florida eagle cam is Lady Hawk. She has collected a variety of videos from the streaming cam that highlight some of the best moments. The video coverage starts on Sept. 9 and is updated each day something significant happens. You may watch those videos below. Harriet first paired with an eagle named Ozzie who unfortunately passed away in 2015. After looking for suitors, Harriet paired with M15, and the couple raised their first brood in Jan. 2016. Now the pair is embarking on their journey again with two new eggs. The eggs for the fifth season were laid on Nov. 22, 2016, and Nov. 25, 2016. All eyes are on the cam as they are expected to hatch at any moment. It is against Florida law to disturb eagles or their nests. Due to that law, the live streaming eagle cam is a look at life in the wild. If an eagle is under attack, you will see the live stream from one of the three cams set up on the property. Dick Pritchett advises people to watch the eagle cam streaming live online from their homes, or through their mobile devices. It isn’t recommended to try and view the nests in person. The cams are situated in a premium location and will give the best view to viewers. The Southwest Florida eagle cam gives a look into the daily lives of eagles you otherwise would not see. Also, those who attempt to see the nests in person will be recorded, so it is best to appreciate the efforts Pritchett has invested in providing the live stream for millions of people to see, free of charge, 24/7. Stay tuned as we’ll bring you the latest news and updates as soon as the eagleets hatch. Are you going to watch the eagle cam live stream? [Featured Image by Rocky Grimes/Shutterstock]

'Eagle Cam' Live: Bald Eagles In Southwest Florida Wait For 2 Eaglets To Hatch, Watch The Livestream!

Have you ever seen a bald eagle give birth? Have you had a chance to witness an eaglet hatch? Chances are that a vast number of people cannot answer “yes” to either of those questions. Perhaps that is why a certain livestream on YouTube of bald eagles in Southwest Florida is getting a lot of attention. The livestream eagle footage, which is hosted by Dick Pritchett Real Estate, features bald eagles Harriet and MI5 taking turns sitting in a nest – patiently waiting for the arrival of their two young eaglets. 5 Facts You Didn’t Know about America’s Beloved Bald Eagle. https://t.co/qrm2DkceJU pic.twitter.com/uJGof7OFLs — James Lucas Ⓥ (@JamesELucas) December 28, 2016 According to the Dick Pratchett Real Estate website, there are three separate camera angles being used to film the eagles throughout the duration of the livestream. While the close-up footage may seem to place the cameras in close proximity of the actual nest, none of the cameras can be seen or heard by the eagles. “Eagles are wild birds and anything can happen in the wild. The Southwest Florida Eagle Camera (SWFEC) does not interfere or intervene and allows nature to take its course. You will see life and you might see death, but this is nature at her finest.” This is apparently not the first time that Harriet went viral with footage of this type of in-nest hatching experience. She reportedly went viral more than four years ago in October of 2012 when millions of people watched her raise two eaglets with her then-partner Ozzie. Ozzie and Harriet – a couple who was likely named after the popular 1950s ABC sitcom The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet – hatched another pair of eaglets. Unfortunately, one of those eaglets passed away at the age of 41-days old. Sadly, Ozzie and Harriet suffered a similar tragedy in 2014 when one of their two newest eaglets died nearly one month after first hatching. Photos of #SWFL bald eagles Ozzie and Harriet through the years. Gallery: https://t.co/DY3vWfcx5C pic.twitter.com/E54pH43HgZ — Naples Daily News (@ndn) October 1, 2016 After sustaining severe injuries during a flight, Ozzie passed away himself in 2015. However, Harriet “found love” again when she met M15 and the “lovebirds” welcomed their first pair of eaglets together this past January. Maintaining an average of two eaglets per clutch is accurate for bald eagles, according to the Hancock Wildlife Foundation. Each of the two eggs is laid nearly 3 days apart. In the case of M15 and Harriet, the two eggs featured in the current “eagle cam” livestream were laid right on schedule – November 22nd and 25th respectively. Once the eagles start sitting on the egg to raise its temperature, the incubation period (which typically lasts 35 days) begins. Since the incubation period lines up with the timeline in which the eggs were first laid, this means that the eaglets usually hatch 3 days apart as well. As seen with M15 and Harriet, both of the eagles share the responsibility of incubating their eggs. However, studies have shown that the mother eagle usually takes the longer overnight shifts and during inclement weather. The fish-eagle is probably the most familiar bird of prey in Africa females lay 1-3 eggs incubation approx 44 days pic.twitter.com/1MiTMZIyXg — africanwildlife (@awpfnow) June 14, 2016 Throughout the incubation period, the eggs are typically rolled over every 1-2 hours. This is done to make sure the lighter yolk never raises to the egg surface. If the eaglet’s fragile blood vessels make contact with and stick to the surface of the egg shell, this could potentially kill the baby eagle before he or she ever hatches. As of 12:55 PM (Eastern Time) on Wednesday, the “eagle cam” livestream has been viewed over 57.2 million times with more than 24,900 people actively watching it. Now it is just a matter of time before these amazing bald eagles, M15 and Harriet, become parents all over again. Thanks to YouTube, millions of people have a chance to experience a very rare eyewitness opportunity! (Featured Image by Tom Gannam/AP Photo)

Study: Stress Is Making American Dogs Go Prematurely Gray

A surprising new study suggests that it’s not just Americans who are under extreme stress these days but our dogs, too — and the stress is making our canine companions go prematurely gray, according to CNN. The study, which was suggested and co-authored by famous animal behavior expert and autism advocate Temple Grandin and published in this month’s edition of the journal Applied Animal Behaviour Science, looked at 400 dogs who were under four years old to see if there was a correlation between their anxiety levels and going prematurely gray. People aren’t the only ones to gray due to stress; now…#dogs turn gray from anxiety, too: https://t.co/2GgOj4Sjor pic.twitter.com/o4N4ntHGwc — Pets for Patriots (@PetsforPatriots) December 20, 2016 “Normally, dogs wouldn’t be gray at age 4,” Grandin said. Animal behaviorist and fellow author Camille King, who owns the Canine Education Center in Denver says she noticed a few years ago that many impulsive and anxious dogs seemed to be turning prematurely gray. She says she told Grandin her observations and Grandin encouraged her to design a study to look into a possible correlation. “The first thing I thought of when she told me that were the presidents, and how they age and get prematurely gray,” said Grandin, who is currently a professor of animal science at Colorado State University. King and Grandin enlisted the aid of fellow animal behavioralists Peter Borchelt and Thomas Smith to visit dog parks, dog shows, veterinary clinics and other locations frequented by dog owners in order to study 400 dogs in Colorado and administer dog behavior questionnaires to their owners, according to Northern Illinois University Today. In the journal article, “Anxiety and impulsivity: Factors associated with premature graying in young dogs,” the researchers said that the dog owners were told that the purpose of the study involved dog lifestyle, in order to prevent response bias. They said that “distractor items” were also added to the survey to prevent the owner from guessing the purpose of the survey. Measures of anxiety in the dogs included answers such as destruction when dogs were left alone, loss of hair during vet exams or being in a new place, and cringing or cowering in response to groups of people. Examples of behaviors that indicated impulsive behaviors included jumping on people, not being able to get calm, loss of focus and hyperactivity after exercise. Even dogs can get gray hair from stress. Or from paint in trashcans. #DoggieDepression pic.twitter.com/xDLTOfiILd — Joe Paradis (@joe_paradis) August 9, 2013 The researchers had independent raters examine photos taken of the dogs at the sites and rate the extent of the dogs’ muzzle grayness. Only non-white dogs were used for the study, in order to show graying. The researchers found that dogs between one and four years of age whose owners reported higher signs of anxiety tended to show a greater extent of premature muzzle graying than the less anxious dogs. Dogs whose owners rated them as more impulsive also tended to have more prematurely gray muzzles. The study showed that dogs that had more anxious and impulsive behaviors did tend to show premature graying. In our sample of young dogs, latent variable regression showed that the extent of muzzle grayness was significantly and positively predicted by anxiety (p = 0.005) and impulsivity (p < 0.001). In addition, female dogs tended to have more premature gray hairs than male dogs. Dog size, whether the dogs were spayed or neutered, and the presence of medical problems did not significantly predict the extent of muzzle grayness, however. Smith, who provided methodological and statistical expertise, said that he was surprised by the results of the study. “At first, I was somewhat skeptical of the hypothesis,” he said. “However, when we analyzed the data, the results actually were quite striking.” Grandin said the results provide important information for dog owners. “This is an original, unique study that has implications for dog welfare,” she said. [Featured Image by Puzzle/Shutterstock]

Watch Southwest Florida Eagle Cam Live Streaming Online: Eggs And Eaglets Updates Plus Free Teaching And Educational Resources [Video]

If you’re glued to the exciting world revealed through the Southwest Florida eagle cam you aren’t alone. Over the past four years, millions have tuned in to watch Ozzie and Harriet, and now Ozzie and M15 bring the miracle of wildlife to the masses. With three cams strategically placed in North Fort Myers, Florida, the Southwest Florida eagle cam has brought to life each stage from mating and laying eggs, to the first pip or internal egg hatching and crack, to the arrival of eaglets and watching them grow and leave the nest. Viewers have watched every important moment as it happens, streaming live online, thanks to the courtesy of Dick Pritchett of Dick Pritchett Real Estate. You may watch the live streaming eagle cam provided by Dick Pritchett in the video player above. Harriet & M continue their daily routine as Hatch Watch continues. Will today be the day? pic.twitter.com/HYA0DnmCo2 — SWFL Eagle Cam (@SWFLEagleCAM) December 28, 2016 Those watching Harriet, M15 and the two eggs will find that each moment brings new updates. At this current time, there are pips or the beginning cracks in both eggs. The world is on eaglet watch as they anxiously await the arrival of two eaglets. As referred to by the official Southwest Florida eagle cam, the eaglets should hatch within the next 48 hours now that the pips or first cracks have appeared in both eggs. You may see photos from the Southwest Florida eagle site here: Southwest Florida eagle cam photos. The photos are a visual documentary of the journey Harriet and M15 have made this fifth season. This is their second clutch, and all eyes are awaiting the new eaglets arrival. Because this is a live stream, it’s important to realize that sometimes life is unfair, cruel and vicious. Due to Florida’s wildlife laws, Pritchett isn’t allowed to physically manhandle the nest or the birds. If he were to suspect something was wrong with the eggs, he would have to let nature take its course and not interfere. This can be distressing for young viewers, as the Southwest Florida eagle cam has attracted viewers of all ages. The cam is a wonderful educational tool for those who want to witness the miracle of birth in the wild. As bald eagles are seen throughout the United States, the Southwest Florida live eagle cam might serve as a starting point to bring conservation efforts and awareness to threatened and endangered species in other areas. Those living in another state might find that viewing the live stream is the perfect opportunity to exploring their local fish and wildlife service and live cams in their local region. From California to Florida, bald eagles can be found and htere is much to learn about the national U.S. bird. The live eagle cam is also an invaluable teaching tool for those who are invested in eagle conservation. Those who are watching the Southwest Florida eagle cam live stream and using it as a teaching tool may find the following educational resources helpful. Florida Fish and Wildlife Bald Eagles: Life History and Habitat The Center for Conservation Biology: Facts About Bald Eagles Annenberg Learner: Bald Eagle Life Cycle and Facts The Cornell Lab of Ornithology: All About Bald Eagles U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Eagle Facts (pdf) Conserve Wildlife Foundation of New Jersey: Bald Eagles Lesson Plans Conserve Wildlife Foundation of New Jersey Lesson Plan: Blogging Using Live Cams (great resource for those following the Southwest Florida live streaming eagle cam, PDF) The Bald Eagle: An Educational Activity Guide by the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers Celebrating the American Bald Eagle by Farr Integrating IT (lesson plans, links and Native American mythology and legends) U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service: National Wildlife Refuge Coloring Book(PDF) Smithsonian’s National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute: Bald Eagle California Department of Fish and Wildlife: Bald Eagles in California National Park Service (NPS) Channel Island Bald Eagles United States Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) Bald and Golden Eagles Missouri Department of Conservation Field Guide: Bald Eagle New York Department of Environmental Conservation: Bald Eagle Fact Sheet Maryland Departmen of Natural Resources: Bald Eagle National Park Service Kenai Fjords, Alaska Bald Eagles National Park Service: Bald Eagles in Yellowstone Columbian Park Lafayette, Indiana Lafayette Parks and Recreation: Bald Eagles Texas Parks and Wildlife: Bald Eagles Bald Eagle Coloring Page(Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection) Bald Eagle Activity Sheet (PDF) Chesapeake Bay Program: Bald Eagles National Park Service Webrangers: Bald Eagles Bald Eagle Awareness Week Activity Book from South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks (45 page, PDF) U.S. Forest Service: Bald Eagle Facts (pdf) U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered Species Coloring Book(pdf) Arkansas Birds Coloring Book(pdf) Arizona Activity and Coloring Book: Bald Eagles (pdf) Wildlife of New Jersey Coloring Book: Bald Eagles (pdf) Those who want to learn more about the bald eagle as a species can check out the following documentary by National Geographic. It is a Nature documentary, and provides an in-depth look at the bald eagle in the wild. You may watch American Eagle in the video player below. Are you watching the Southwest Florida eagle cam live stream? It is a wonderful way to learn more about these endangered species and as many children nationwide are on holiday break, a great way to bring a bit of education to their holiday vacation in a fun and non-threatening or boring way. [Featured Image by Rocky Grimes/Shutterstock]

Dog Mauls Family Members Who Tried To Put Him In Christmas Sweater, Continues Attack Despite Being Stabbed, Tasered, And Tranquilized

A dog mauled three family members after they tried to put him in a Christmas sweater. The enraged dog would continue attacking the family despite being stabbed in the head and neck. When police arrived, the dog was still aggressive, so a taser was utilized on the pet. However, police note the taser did not stop the dog, and tranquilizer darts were deployed. Even after the tranquilizers, the dog was able to get into a room with children and police began shooting it with a beanbag gun before it was subdued. WTSP reports that a couple from Tampa, Florida, was attacked by their pet dog, a pit bull mix named Scarface, while attempting to put the dog in a festival Christmas sweater. The incident occurred when 52-year-old Brenda Guerrero went to her backyard with a new sweater for her pet dog Scarface. The pit bull mix was playing in the backyard when Brenda approached him and began trying to put him into the festive sweater. Dog Mauls Family After They Try to Dress It in a Christmas Sweater A pit bull mix named Scarface attacked its own… https://t.co/Gq78lzLo6d — Trend Style Daily (@TrendStyleDaily) January 1, 2017 Before she could cloth the dog, she was attacked. Brenda’s husband 46-year-old Ismael Guerrero saw the dog biting his wife’s arm and went to aide her. Ismael began trying to pull the dog off of his wife but was attacked himself. The dog continued to maul the pair, so the couple’s 22-year-old son Antoine Harris intervened, bringing a knife to stab the animal. Antoine reported stabbed the dog in the neck and head. While many dogs, including bully breeds, do not mind wearing sweaters, Brenda Guerrero was mauled by her pet dog Scarface when trying to put him into a festive sweater for the holidays. (Image by Tercer Ojo Photography/ Shutterstock) Harris was also mauled by the dog as he attempted to free his parents but by stabbing the dog the trio was able to escape inside. The family called the police to help subdue the dog and authorities responded to the location and attempted to use a taser on the dog. According to the Daily Mail, despite hitting the dog with the taser, the animal was still too aggressive and was not subdued. As a result, tranquilizer darts were deployed. Pit bull mauls family who tried to put him in a Christmas sweater https://t.co/KSDOWrJmDw pic.twitter.com/vksW8tPRRQ — Daily Mail US (@DailyMail) January 1, 2017 After hitting the dog with the tranquilizers, the police report indicates that the dog was still able to somehow make its way inside where children were present. The police then used a bean bag gun to hit the now tased and tranquilized dog into submission. “Officers responding said the dog was pretty aggressive. When they Tasered the dog, it was still pulling away and was able to release the prongs from the Taser.” Brenda and Ismael were taken to the hospital for their injuries, but both are expected to recover. Brenda’s injuries were described by hospital staff as “serious but not life-threatening.” No word on the injuries sustained by the couple’s son Antoine Harris. No word on if the dog is expected to be put down, but authorities have revealed the dog is now in the custody of animal control. The Guerrero family wasn’t the only one to be attacked on Christmas by a dog. A 7-year-old Georgia boy was attacked by his neighbor’s two pit bulls on Christmas Eve leaving him with 300 stitches and only one ear. The child was playing in his grandmother’s yard when the two dogs jumped the fence and attacked the boy, dragging him over the fence. [Featured Image by Sheryl Lynch/Shutterstock]

Intern Saves Dog's Life: Quick-Thinking Vet's Assistant Saves Pet Moment Before Being Put Down

A veterinary intern saved a dog’s life moments before the beloved family pet was to be put to sleep, after she just happened to notice a tick that turned out to be the cause of the dog’s rapidly deteriorating health, KTRK (Houston) is reporting. 10-year-old Ollie, a Sheltie, went with his family on a trip to eastern Oregon. When the family returned to Portland, however, Ollie’s health went downhill in a hurry. The once-vibrant dog was suddenly lethargic. He had no appetite. As his mystery illness progressed, he couldn’t relieve himself and could barely move. His owners, Al and Joelle Meteney, took him to DoveLewis Animal Hospital in Portland. Vet student finds tick on sick dog moments before adorable sheltie was to be euthanized https://t.co/Y3BoGJFL0L — Yahoo News (@YahooNews) May 24, 2016 There, according to a press release from DoveLewis, veterinarians ran a full battery of tests, but were unable to find anything that could pinpoint the cause of Ollie’s illness. “Al and Joelle didn’t wait long before taking Ollie to their regular veterinarian, who conducted a full range of tests, including blood work, a urinalysis, and a variety of X-rays. But they simply couldn’t find a reason for Ollie’s diminishing health. He was given medication that could potentially help, but Ollie only got worse the next day.” Eventually, Ollie’s family made the difficult decision to have their beloved dog put down. Dr. Adam Stone was put in charge of caring for Ollie in his final moments. Neena Golden, a veterinary intern, was helping Dr. Stone with the procedure. As she went to comfort the sick dog, petting him behind his ears, she noticed a lump. That lump turned out to be a tick; even though Ollie wore a flea and tick collar, the parasite had still managed to bite into Ollie’s skin. As it turns out, that tick was the source of Ollie’s mystery illness. It’s #tick season & while #TickParalysis isn’t very common it can be deadly if not caught. What to do @KHQLocalNews pic.twitter.com/ohfHlajoJR — Caitlin Rearden (@KHQCaitlin) May 24, 2016 Ollie had come down with “Tick Paralysis” – a rare condition in which toxins in saliva from the tick gets into the dog’s bloodstream and eventually attack the animal’s nervous system. This essentially paralyzes the animal – he or she will be unable to eat, walk, or relieve himself or herself, and if untreated, will eventually die. Tick Paralysis is rare – so rare that it’s barely even mentioned in veterinary school, as Dr. Stone explains. “I had never seen a tick paralysis case. It’s one of those things you learn about randomly in school – it’s on one slide during one presentation.” The good thing about Tick Paralysis is that, once the offending tick is removed, the dog should be back to his or her old self within a few days. Vets at DoveLewis removed the offending tick and, to be sure, shaved the rest of Ollie’s fur to make sure there were no other ticks (there weren’t), and then sent him home. A mere ten hours after barely escaping euthanasia, Ollie was showing signs of being on the mend. He started walking around the house, and made it to the door to signal for a bathroom break. When Al and Joelle notified the veterinary staff of Ollie’s turnaround, they were overjoyed. “When we got the call from his owners that Ollie was doing fine, we all high-fived each other. That might be the one tick paralysis case I experience in my career. It was exciting that we could help.” Now Ollie is home and is 100 percent cured, thanks to the quick-thinking intern. His owners have found to make sure he wears a tick collar and takes oral anti-tick medication the next time he goes out with his family. [Image via Shutterstock/WilleeCole Photography]

Orangutan Escapes Enclosure A Second Time At Busch Gardens In Tampa Bay

An orangutan escaped her enclosure at Busch Gardens in Tampa Bay on Friday afternoon. Luna the orangutan climbed up a tree then fell to the ground. She shuffled around briefly while some took photos and recorded the event. Park visitors were evacuated by staff, who tranquilized the animal with a dart before taking her back to her section of Busch Gardens. A mild panic unfolded among visitors, but overall people remained calm. “This afternoon, Busch Gardens Tampa Bay moved guests safely out of the Stanleyville area of the park when a female orangutan was outside of her habitat,” the park said in a statement. “The animal care team responded immediately and the animal is back safely and securely in its habitat without incident. “The safety of our guests, employees and animals is our No. 1 priority.” This is the second time that an orangutan has escaped its habitat at the facility, Tampa Bay Times reports. On June 16, a young male managed to break free from his enclosure in the Jungala area of the park. Workers coaxed him back to his enclosure without any problems. It wasn’t revealed how long Luna was out of her habitat, but she was returned to her exhibit at 6:30 p.m., according to Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission spokesman Gary Morse. Several segments of the park were either on lock down or evacuated. Orangutan got loose at Busch Gardens. This is moments after it happened… half the park has been shut down, people were erratic. #Harembe #NotKilled #CouldveBeenBad #BuschGardens #IWantMyMoneyBack #HappyToBeAlive #ItWasntAggressive #ItFell40Ft #AndItWasEmbarrassed #NoOneKnewWhatToDo one employee thought they were always allowed to wander the park. #FireThatWoman @katieg929 @buschgardens #TangItsAKickInTheGlass A video posted by Nicholas James Scodary (@cardsfanaddict) on Jul 1, 2016 at 2:03pm PDT A visitor at Busch Gardens Tampa Bay — Jason Mayhew — was one of those among the evacuated from the area after the orangutan escaped her enclosure. He said park workers were upfront about what was happening and wanted to make sure everyone stayed calm. “They were stalling and stalling,” Mayhew said. “Finally, someone said due to safety concerns, they had to clear the entire theater. People looked a little panicky, but everyone kept their composure.” Morse says FWC intend to investigate Luna’s escape. This isn’t her first one. Park spokeswoman Karen Varga-Sinka said in 2008, Luna cleared a 12-foot-high wall to get out of her exhibit. She was 10-years-old and weighed 85 pounds at the time. It took 25 caretakers using carrots, apples, and vanilla ice cream to lure her back where she belonged. Florida is the scene for wild animal news lately. Just a few short weeks ago, a toddler drowned after he was pulled into the water by an alligator at Disney resort while playing in the water. 2-year-old Lane Graves was playing in very shallow water on a resort beach when the reptile dragged him underwater. Last week, FWC officials found the reptile they believe harmed the little boy and humanely euthanized it. UPDATE: The orangutan has been captured at Busch Gardens without incident and is back in its enclosure.https://t.co/6TdieIn1sF — Fox 35 News (@Fox35News) July 1, 2016 Sometimes animals at exhibits, like zoos and theme parks, get loose. Many animals are capable of scaling tall fences, descending up trees, and finding other means of getting out of their habitat. It’s an infrequent occurrence, but alarming, nonetheless. ABC Action News spoke with several park goers, who expressed concern for the orangutan’s escape. They think the park should find out why the apes keep getting loose and resolve the issue. “It’s probably something they want to take a look at with all the instances going on with animal safety around the world,” said park visitor, Richard Rodriguez. Other guests were thrilled to see a captive animal out of its habitat. Many began recording the escaped orangutan with their phones as they didn’t show much fear of anything going terribly wrong. Since this is the second time in two weeks that an orangutan escaped its enclosure and has made national news, it’s safe to say that park staff and wildlife officials will do everything possible to prevent future escapes! [Photo via Shutterstock]