Alzheimer’s Disease: 8 Amazing Tips To Prevent The Disease

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common cause of dementia. The word dementia describes a set of symptoms that can include memory loss and difficulties with thinking, problem-solving or language. These symptoms occur when the brain is damaged by certain diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease. The symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease are generally mild to start with, but they get worse over time and start to interfere with daily life. Here are 8 amazing ways to prevent Alzheimer’s disease according to Prevention: 1. Eat more fruits and veggiesLike us on Facebook A population-based cohort study of 1,836 older Japanese-Americans found that consumption of fruit and vegetable juices was associated with decreased incidence of Alzheimer’s over seven to nine years of follow-up. 2. Have more berries Try to consume more berries each day for full benefit as it contains high levels of biologically active components, including a class of compounds called anthocyanosides, which fight memory impairment associated with free radicals and beta-amyloid plaques in the brain. 3. Include omega-3 fatty acids rich foods in your diet Omega-3 fatty acids are found in fish like salmon, mackerel and tuna. It helps to lower the rates of Alzheimer. Jaylaxmi Trivedi | Health Aim Alzheimer’s: Transmission Through Donated Tissue Possible, Says Study 4. Have more folate containing foods or take folic acid supplements High levels of homocysteine may be associated with poor cognitive function. Some findings indicate that reducing homocysteine with folic acid may increase cognitive function. 5. Wine or purple grape juice Components in grape skins protect brain cells from the toxic effect of oxidative stress and beta amyloid. 6. Mediterranean diet Mediterranean diet was found to have lower incidence of Alzheimer’s when compared with those who did not follow this diet (Mediterranean diet emphasizes eating primarily plant-based foods, such as fruits and vegetables, whole grains, legumes and nuts. Replacing butter with healthy fats, such as olive oil. Using herbs and spices instead of salt to flavor foods. Limiting red meat to no more than a few times a month. Eating fish and poultry at least twice a week. Drinking red wine in moderation (optional) according to Mayoclinic). 7. Blood Pressure control Always control your BP and keep it normal as it is associated with increased risk of vascular dementia and Alzheimer’s. 8. Strong Social Support Try to be more social and have strong network of friends. Be active. Photo: Flickr

Gum Disease Signals Faster Cognitive Decline In Alzheimer’s Patients

People suffering from Alzheimer’s experience faster cognitive decline if they have a gum disease too. These are the findings of a new study conducted by a research team at the University of Southampton in the UK. According to the senior study author Clive Holmes, Alzheimer’s patient with severe gum disease face steep cognitive decline, irrespective of the severity of the dementia. The researchers conducted their study on patients who were mild to moderately impaired. In an interview with Reuters Health, Holmes said that gum disease is often left in the hands of the dentists for investigation and treatment. However, it is actually an important common low grade chronic infection. Glen Campbell In Alzheimer’s Stage 7: Understanding The 7 Stages Of The Disease During the study, the researchers looked at 60 subjects with mild to moderate form of the disease. The patients living at home were followed for a period of six months. All of the subjects had at least 10 teeth, did not smoke and were not treated for any kind of gum disease in the last six months.Like us on Facebook Blood samples from each subject were withdrawn at the start of the study and the participants were also asked to complete a cognitive assessment. In addition, the subjects were checked by a dentist and hygienist, and their caretakers were questioned about their dental and medical history. It was found that 22 subjects out of 60 had moderate to severe gum disease. The same tests were repeated at the end of six months. The researchers report in the journal PLOS ONE that by the end of six months, one patient had died, three were not followed up and three had withdrawn themselves from the study. Those who had periodontitis at the start of the study got less cognitive score than those who did not have a gum disease. In another independent study conducted by Holmes and his co-authors, it was found that conditions such as chest congestion, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and urinary tract infections increase the progression of the disease in Alzheimer’s patients. Photo Sources: Pixabay, Flickr

Gum Disease Signals Faster Cognitive Decline In Alzheimer’s Patients

People suffering from Alzheimer’s experience faster cognitive decline if they have a gum disease too. These are the findings of a new study conducted by a research team at the University of Southampton in the UK. According to the senior study author Clive Holmes, Alzheimer’s patient with severe gum disease face steep cognitive decline, irrespective of the severity of the dementia. The researchers conducted their study on patients who were mild to moderately impaired. In an interview with Reuters Health, Holmes said that gum disease is often left in the hands of the dentists for investigation and treatment. However, it is actually an important common low grade chronic infection. Glen Campbell In Alzheimer’s Stage 7: Understanding The 7 Stages Of The Disease During the study, the researchers looked at 60 subjects with mild to moderate form of the disease. The patients living at home were followed for a period of six months. All of the subjects had at least 10 teeth, did not smoke and were not treated for any kind of gum disease in the last six months.Like us on Facebook Blood samples from each subject were withdrawn at the start of the study and the participants were also asked to complete a cognitive assessment. In addition, the subjects were checked by a dentist and hygienist, and their caretakers were questioned about their dental and medical history. It was found that 22 subjects out of 60 had moderate to severe gum disease. The same tests were repeated at the end of six months. The researchers report in the journal PLOS ONE that by the end of six months, one patient had died, three were not followed up and three had withdrawn themselves from the study. Those who had periodontitis at the start of the study got less cognitive score than those who did not have a gum disease. In another independent study conducted by Holmes and his co-authors, it was found that conditions such as chest congestion, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and urinary tract infections increase the progression of the disease in Alzheimer’s patients. Photo Sources: Pixabay, Flickr

Gum Disease Signals Faster Cognitive Decline In Alzheimer’s Patients

People suffering from Alzheimer’s experience faster cognitive decline if they have a gum disease too. These are the findings of a new study conducted by a research team at the University of Southampton in the UK. According to the senior study author Clive Holmes, Alzheimer’s patient with severe gum disease face steep cognitive decline, irrespective of the severity of the dementia. The researchers conducted their study on patients who were mild to moderately impaired. In an interview with Reuters Health, Holmes said that gum disease is often left in the hands of the dentists for investigation and treatment. However, it is actually an important common low grade chronic infection. Glen Campbell In Alzheimer’s Stage 7: Understanding The 7 Stages Of The Disease During the study, the researchers looked at 60 subjects with mild to moderate form of the disease. The patients living at home were followed for a period of six months. All of the subjects had at least 10 teeth, did not smoke and were not treated for any kind of gum disease in the last six months.Like us on Facebook Blood samples from each subject were withdrawn at the start of the study and the participants were also asked to complete a cognitive assessment. In addition, the subjects were checked by a dentist and hygienist, and their caretakers were questioned about their dental and medical history. It was found that 22 subjects out of 60 had moderate to severe gum disease. The same tests were repeated at the end of six months. The researchers report in the journal PLOS ONE that by the end of six months, one patient had died, three were not followed up and three had withdrawn themselves from the study. Those who had periodontitis at the start of the study got less cognitive score than those who did not have a gum disease. In another independent study conducted by Holmes and his co-authors, it was found that conditions such as chest congestion, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and urinary tract infections increase the progression of the disease in Alzheimer’s patients. Photo Sources: Pixabay, Flickr

Gum Disease Signals Faster Cognitive Decline In Alzheimer’s Patients

People suffering from Alzheimer’s experience faster cognitive decline if they have a gum disease too. These are the findings of a new study conducted by a research team at the University of Southampton in the UK. According to the senior study author Clive Holmes, Alzheimer’s patient with severe gum disease face steep cognitive decline, irrespective of the severity of the dementia. The researchers conducted their study on patients who were mild to moderately impaired. In an interview with Reuters Health, Holmes said that gum disease is often left in the hands of the dentists for investigation and treatment. However, it is actually an important common low grade chronic infection. Glen Campbell In Alzheimer’s Stage 7: Understanding The 7 Stages Of The Disease During the study, the researchers looked at 60 subjects with mild to moderate form of the disease. The patients living at home were followed for a period of six months. All of the subjects had at least 10 teeth, did not smoke and were not treated for any kind of gum disease in the last six months.Like us on Facebook Blood samples from each subject were withdrawn at the start of the study and the participants were also asked to complete a cognitive assessment. In addition, the subjects were checked by a dentist and hygienist, and their caretakers were questioned about their dental and medical history. It was found that 22 subjects out of 60 had moderate to severe gum disease. The same tests were repeated at the end of six months. The researchers report in the journal PLOS ONE that by the end of six months, one patient had died, three were not followed up and three had withdrawn themselves from the study. Those who had periodontitis at the start of the study got less cognitive score than those who did not have a gum disease. In another independent study conducted by Holmes and his co-authors, it was found that conditions such as chest congestion, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and urinary tract infections increase the progression of the disease in Alzheimer’s patients. Photo Sources: Pixabay, Flickr

Gum Disease Signals Faster Cognitive Decline In Alzheimer’s Patients

People suffering from Alzheimer’s experience faster cognitive decline if they have a gum disease too. These are the findings of a new study conducted by a research team at the University of Southampton in the UK. According to the senior study author Clive Holmes, Alzheimer’s patient with severe gum disease face steep cognitive decline, irrespective of the severity of the dementia. The researchers conducted their study on patients who were mild to moderately impaired. In an interview with Reuters Health, Holmes said that gum disease is often left in the hands of the dentists for investigation and treatment. However, it is actually an important common low grade chronic infection. Glen Campbell In Alzheimer’s Stage 7: Understanding The 7 Stages Of The Disease During the study, the researchers looked at 60 subjects with mild to moderate form of the disease. The patients living at home were followed for a period of six months. All of the subjects had at least 10 teeth, did not smoke and were not treated for any kind of gum disease in the last six months.Like us on Facebook Blood samples from each subject were withdrawn at the start of the study and the participants were also asked to complete a cognitive assessment. In addition, the subjects were checked by a dentist and hygienist, and their caretakers were questioned about their dental and medical history. It was found that 22 subjects out of 60 had moderate to severe gum disease. The same tests were repeated at the end of six months. The researchers report in the journal PLOS ONE that by the end of six months, one patient had died, three were not followed up and three had withdrawn themselves from the study. Those who had periodontitis at the start of the study got less cognitive score than those who did not have a gum disease. In another independent study conducted by Holmes and his co-authors, it was found that conditions such as chest congestion, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and urinary tract infections increase the progression of the disease in Alzheimer’s patients. Photo Sources: Pixabay, Flickr

Lost Memories Found: Alzheimer’s Patients Can Regain Their Lost Memories

A new study has discovered an effective way to retrieve lost memories of people suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. According to the research team, throwing light on damaged brain cells can help gain lost memories back. The study, conducted by researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in the US, shows that stimulating damaged brain cells in Alzheimer’s patients can trigger them to produce new connections. Although conducted on mice, the study shows that the method can be used to reverse memory loss during the early stages of the disease. Gum Disease Signals Faster Cognitive Decline In Alzheimer’s Patients During the study, the researchers genetically engineered two different strains of mice to develop symptoms of Alzheimer’s. Next, the team specifically tagged the damaged brain cells in mice with a special photo-sensitive protein.Like us on Facebook The team then used a technique called optogenetics to activate the tagged cells. Optogenetics makes use of light to stimulate specific target cells. The researchers confirmed that the mice had actually lost a part of the memory by checking if they remember receiving a mild shock treatment to their feet. The team found that activating the tagged cells with the help of light made lost memories return in the mice. The mice started to display a fear response when placed in the chamber where the shock had been applied an hour earlier, reports The Telegraph. An exposure to light triggered the cells to grow dendritic spines, a type of small buds which form synaptic connections with the surrounding cells. The team says that their research proves the fact that memories are not lost. They exist somewhere and the key is to know how to retrieve them. “While the findings raise intriguing questions about whether it’s possible to recover lost memories, there is a long way to go to understand this process in people and how it’s affected over the course of a disease like Alzheimer’s,” said Dr Simon Ridley of the Alzheimer’s Research UK. The complete details of the study have been published in the journal Nature. Photo Sources: Pixabay, Wikimedia

Lost Memories Found: Alzheimer’s Patients Can Regain Their Lost Memories

A new study has discovered an effective way to retrieve lost memories of people suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. According to the research team, throwing light on damaged brain cells can help gain lost memories back. The study, conducted by researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in the US, shows that stimulating damaged brain cells in Alzheimer’s patients can trigger them to produce new connections. Although conducted on mice, the study shows that the method can be used to reverse memory loss during the early stages of the disease. Gum Disease Signals Faster Cognitive Decline In Alzheimer’s Patients During the study, the researchers genetically engineered two different strains of mice to develop symptoms of Alzheimer’s. Next, the team specifically tagged the damaged brain cells in mice with a special photo-sensitive protein.Like us on Facebook The team then used a technique called optogenetics to activate the tagged cells. Optogenetics makes use of light to stimulate specific target cells. The researchers confirmed that the mice had actually lost a part of the memory by checking if they remember receiving a mild shock treatment to their feet. The team found that activating the tagged cells with the help of light made lost memories return in the mice. The mice started to display a fear response when placed in the chamber where the shock had been applied an hour earlier, reports The Telegraph. An exposure to light triggered the cells to grow dendritic spines, a type of small buds which form synaptic connections with the surrounding cells. The team says that their research proves the fact that memories are not lost. They exist somewhere and the key is to know how to retrieve them. “While the findings raise intriguing questions about whether it’s possible to recover lost memories, there is a long way to go to understand this process in people and how it’s affected over the course of a disease like Alzheimer’s,” said Dr Simon Ridley of the Alzheimer’s Research UK. The complete details of the study have been published in the journal Nature. Photo Sources: Pixabay, Wikimedia

Lost Memories Found: Alzheimer’s Patients Can Regain Their Lost Memories

A new study has discovered an effective way to retrieve lost memories of people suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. According to the research team, throwing light on damaged brain cells can help gain lost memories back. The study, conducted by researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in the US, shows that stimulating damaged brain cells in Alzheimer’s patients can trigger them to produce new connections. Although conducted on mice, the study shows that the method can be used to reverse memory loss during the early stages of the disease. Gum Disease Signals Faster Cognitive Decline In Alzheimer’s Patients During the study, the researchers genetically engineered two different strains of mice to develop symptoms of Alzheimer’s. Next, the team specifically tagged the damaged brain cells in mice with a special photo-sensitive protein.Like us on Facebook The team then used a technique called optogenetics to activate the tagged cells. Optogenetics makes use of light to stimulate specific target cells. The researchers confirmed that the mice had actually lost a part of the memory by checking if they remember receiving a mild shock treatment to their feet. The team found that activating the tagged cells with the help of light made lost memories return in the mice. The mice started to display a fear response when placed in the chamber where the shock had been applied an hour earlier, reports The Telegraph. An exposure to light triggered the cells to grow dendritic spines, a type of small buds which form synaptic connections with the surrounding cells. The team says that their research proves the fact that memories are not lost. They exist somewhere and the key is to know how to retrieve them. “While the findings raise intriguing questions about whether it’s possible to recover lost memories, there is a long way to go to understand this process in people and how it’s affected over the course of a disease like Alzheimer’s,” said Dr Simon Ridley of the Alzheimer’s Research UK. The complete details of the study have been published in the journal Nature. Photo Sources: Pixabay, Wikimedia

Nike HyperAdapt 1.0: Top 5 Things That Will Surprise You About The Self-Lacing Shoes

Here it comes, the most anticipated upgrade of the self-lacing shoes technology from Nike has been officially announced for release. So what are the top five things that will surprise you about the Nike HyperAdapt 1.0 Self-Lacing Shoes? Directly straight from News.Nike.Com, here are some of the things about the shoes that you don’t want to miss out. Self-Lacing Shoes for Parkinson’sLike us on Facebook Self-Lacing Technology – of course, this is the main point of the release. But do you know how this works? Well, the innovators from Nike made the shows in a way that when your heel reaches the base of the shoe when you wear it, it will automatically tighten the shoe. At the same time, there are buttons available – tighten or lose. It may be up to the wearer if which fit of the laces suits him best. Inspired By Back To The Future – can you still remember Marty McFly? The ‘80s movie actually gave the first impressions of the Self-Lacing Shoes. It became a reality after more than 30 years from its original concept – well that’s history! Initial Release Was For Charity – Sadly, Michael J. Fox, the star of Back To The Future, suffers Parkinson’s Disease, and with that in mind, he gave support to other Parkinson’s victims. Therefore, with the initial release of Self-Lacing shoes last 2015, Nike donated proceeds for the said charity – and Michael J. Fox received a special pair of the shoes – that brings back memories. Can Benefit Parkinson’s Victims – the benefit is not just about charitable donations – the technology itself can become an ideal alternative for those with Parkinson’s. One symptoms of Parkinson’s is the inability to hold objects firmly, and tying a shoelace is one of the most challenging ones. With the self-lacing tech, at the very least, victims can enjoy a walk without worrying much of the lacing. Adaptive Lacing Cater the Changing Needs of Wearer – sometimes we find ourselves finding the perfect fit for a shoe lace. That is what Nike is aiming for. Currently, HyperAdapt 1.0 can automatically tighten – and a wearer can personally adjust the setting based on his choice. But Nike intends to make the shoe adaptive even while you are playing in the court – it identifies the “current” need of the wearer and will adjust automatically. Photo: YouTube, CNet